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Region

: Franken
Revision 8: edited by sweetstuff on 5/16/2015 (view)
Franken or Franconia is furthest east of ther wine growing regions in western Germany, which makes its climate the least Atlantic and the most Continental.

The Main River and its tributaries provide vines with good irrigation, but unlike the Rhine, the Main does not provide a balanced climate. There are often quick changes in the weather which makes the life of the grapes in the vineyards - planted on the hilly slopes bordering the river - more difficult than in other regions .... but it results in a heartier wine. This may be due to the production of thicker grapeskins in part. The hotter summers and briefer autumns particularly are responsible for this.
While the vine was historically densely planted in this area, the planting is today more broken up by other land uses, and probably only the best sites have survived as vineyards.

However, this region (which is actually northern Bavaria) is dotted with well-preserved imperial 'free towns' from the Middle Ages, since the region was well-placed to exploit emerging trade and technology during this era. This makes a trip here a rich cultural, as well as a vinous, experience, and can be enthusiastically recommended. Towns worth seeing include Würzburg, Regensburg, Nuremburg, Schweinfurt, and many others. This is the capital of the rich southern German Baroque architecture, with many earlier survivals from the Gothic and Romanesque periods as well.

Wines from the Franken region are traditionally very dry white wines. The Stein vineyard, near Würzburg, gave rise to the generic term "Steinwein" by which these wines have generally been known. The distinctive round-shaped, flat green bottle, called a "Bocksbeutel," is also an instant visual clue to their origins. The Bocksbeutel is reserved by law to this region and a small part of Baden that was historically connected to Franconia. However, not all Frankenweine are sold in Bocksbeutels, which can be difficult to cellar because of their shape.

There are three main regions in Franconia: The Mainviereck to the West, a quadrangular region whose main soil is red sandstone and which can make some superb red Spätburgunder wines, the Maindreieck, a triangular region in the center that includes the Würzburg area and which is predominately limestone, excellent for white wines, and the Steigerwald region to the East, a scattered, forested area whose soil is rich in gypsum and alabaster and which have a salty, mineral-laden style of their own.

Müller-Thurgau and Silvaner grapes are the principal varieties grown to produce these hearty, earthy dry wines often compared to white wines from France's Burgundy region, but which have a distinctive style and quality that is all their own. Müller-Thurgau and Silvaner both can make here wines of higher quality than is found anywhere else. The Silvaner wine is certainly a noble variety grown here on the best sites. This makes dry white wines that Hugh Johnson compares in their way to white Burgundy, if not for flavors then for the place at the table. The Rieslaner grape can grow especially well in this region.

The Silvaner (elswhere often called Sylvaner) grape was first imported into Germany from Austria into the Steigerwalt region at Castell.

Bacchus and Ortega grapes are are also grown in the region, often resulting in late harvest wines which are sweeter than the traditional Franken wines. Overall, Franken wines are usually consumed locally and not exported in great quantities, so if you're planning a trip through Franken, drink up!

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Region

: Pfalz
Revision 4: edited by fries on 4/15/2015 (view)

Region

: Rhône
Revision 7: edited by Jeff Leve on 3/9/2015 (view)

Region

: Central Anatolia
Revision 1: edited by ThePlatts on 2/24/2015 (view)
Label shows Akyurt Ankara Turkey

Region

: Languedoc Roussillon
Revision 7: edited by ihavezinned on 12/18/2014 (view)
Inter Sud de France | Vins Languedoc-Roussillon

Wine-Searcher.com: http://www.wine-searcher.com/regions-languedoc-roussillon
Financial Times Article (June 19th 2010 Andrew Jefford):http://bit.ly/bLDytg
Financial Times Article (June 5 2010 Jancis Robinson): http://bit.ly/8ZerX2
David Schildknecht (7th June 2010) Languedoc-Roussillon Best Producers:http://bit.ly/do0LQa

Region

: Sicily
Revision 6: edited by ChipGreen on 12/13/2014 (view)

Region

: Muntenia
Revision 1: edited by charlie11 on 12/9/2014 (view)

Region

: Jura
Revision 3: edited by pgconnolly on 11/24/2014 (view)
A petite and relatively obscure wine region in eastern France, between Burgundy and the Swiss border. Its geographical isolation has helped it to remain a rare bastion of traditional winemaking techniques, and today it produces some of the most distinctive wines in the world. Reds from the Jura are often light-bodied, earthy, berried, and reminiscent of the village wines of Burgundy (though here they are made of local grapes like Poulsard and Trousseau). While Chardonnay features widely, the true specialty of the region is the Vin Jaune (“yellow wine”) made from the white Savagnin grape. Cloudy, difficult Vin Jaune is made only in the best vintages, and must be aged for at least six years before being released. As it ages under a layer of yeast, known locally as “voile,” the wine slowly oxidizes, leading to complex aromas and flavors that range from walnut skin to sultana to spices and truffles. Famously long lived it is always sold in dumpy 62 cl bottle - the wine lost in production having been taken by les anges.

Region

: Italy
Revision 1: edited by dore on 11/23/2014 (view)
Tuscany, Montalcino

Region

: Valais
Revision 1: edited by Eric on 11/3/2014 (view)

Region

: Moselle
Revision 1: edited by charlie11 on 10/7/2014 (view)

Region

: Liguria
Revision 1: edited by charlie11 on 9/17/2014 (view)

Region

: Rheingau
Revision 9: edited by AndrewSGHall on 5/22/2014 (view)
VDP Rheingau (Official site) | The Rheingau (Wines of Germany) | Wikipedia about The Rheingau
On weinlagen.info

The small but fine wine-growing area Rheingau offers one for the culture of the vine ideal microclimate and best soil conditions. The Rhine runs uninterruptedly almost one thousand kilometres from Basel up to its muzzle into the North Sea, in a northerly direction. With a short exception - the Rheingau. The Rheingau mountains force the river to a change in direction here. The vineyards falling in this region to the south stretch really to the sun. The king of the white wines, the Riesling, finds ideal local conditions for the unfolding of his fine fruity and elegant type of vine character on the multilayered weathering grounds with loess, loam and sand additions.

Region

: Friuli-Venezia Giulia
Revision 1: edited by Emotion on 5/8/2014 (view)
Buttrio

Region

: Bordeaux
Revision 23: edited by Jeff Leve on 1/27/2014 (view)

Region

: Burgundy
Revision 28: edited by Eric on 7/29/2013 (view)
Les vins de Bourgogne (Bureau interprofessionnel des vins de Bourgogne) (and in English)
Burgundy - The province of eastern France, famous for its red wines produced from Pinot Noir and its whites produced from Chardonnay. (Small of amounts of Gamay and Aligoté are still grown, although these have to be labeled differently.) The most famous part of the region is known as the Cote d'Or (the Golden Slope). It is divided into the Cote de Beaune, south of the town of Beaune (famous principally for its whites), and the Cote de Nuits, North of Beaune (home of the most famous reds). In addition, the Cote Chalonnaise and the Maconnais are important wine growing regions, although historically a clear level (or more) below the Cote d'Or. Also included by some are the regions of Chablis and Auxerrois, farther north.
Burgundy Report |
Les Grands Jours de Bourgogne - na stejné téma od Heleny Baker

Region

: Champagne
Revision 8: edited by cbosoenophile on 11/26/2012 (view)
Le Champagne (Le comité interprofessionnel du vin de Champagne) | Grandes Marques & Maisons de Champagne (Union des Maisons de Champagne)

France - When it comes to wine, France stands alone. No other country can beat it in terms of consistent quality and diversity. And while many of its Region, Bordeaux, Burgundy and Champagne most obviously, produce wine as rare, as sought-after and nearly as expensive as gold, there are just as many obscurities and values to be had from little known appellations throughout the country. To learn everything there is to know about French wine would take a lifetime. To understand and appreciate French wine, one only has to begin tasting them. Click for a list of bestselling items from all of France.
Sub-Region:

Champagne - The French region of Champagne (including the cities of Rheims, Épernay, and Aÿ) was the first region in the world to make sparkling wine in any quantity. Today, the name of the region is synonymous with the finest of all sparkling wines, and wine-making traditions of Champagne have become role models for sparkling wine producers, worldwide. Surprisingly, the region of Champagne is now responsible for only one bottle in 12 of all sparkling wine produced. Styles of champagne range in sweetness ranging from an extra brut or brut 0, to the basic brut to demi sec to doux; some houses produce single vintage champagnes and others produce non-vintage (or incorporate wines/grapes of multiple vintages), often to preserve a specific taste; combinations of grape varietals; and colors, including a rosé. There are several sub-appellations, including the Valley of the Marnes river running from Épernay west, Massif de Saint-Thierry north and west of Rheims, Valley of the Ardre, the Mountains of Rheims (between Rheims and Épernay), Côte des Blancs, Côte de Sézanne, and Côte des Bar in the South. Champagne wine only uses three grape varietals (cépages): Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Pinot Meunier.

Region

: Washington
Revision 6: edited by Eric on 11/18/2012 (view)
Washington Wine Commission | Credit to Washingtonwine.org for this article

Washington Wine
Washington State is a premium wine producing region located in the northwest corner of the United States. Although a relatively young wine industry, it is now the nation's second largest wine producer and is ranked among the world's top wine regions. Washington wines are found nationally in all 50 states and internationally in more than 40 countries.

Wineries
With 30,000+ acres planted, the state has ideal geography and conditions for growing premium vinifera wine grapes. Primarily grown on their own root stocks, the vines produce grapes of consistent quality, resulting in strong vintages year after year. While its focus is on Chardonnay, Riesling, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Syrah, the region also produces a wide range of other spectacular whites and reds.

Growers
Winemakers from all over the world have chosen to establish themselves in Washington, where they can create wines reflecting this region's unique characteristics. Their hand-crafted wines are receiving wide acclaim from critics regionally, nationally and internationally for their consistently high quality. Many of them have received scores of 90 and above from the major wine media. Overall this is a higher percentage than other leading wine regions.

Regions
As the state's fourth largest fruit crop, the Washington wine industry is an important contributor to the long-term preservation of Washington agriculture. The industry is committed to sustainable agricultural practices and conservation of water resources.
Washington State is a premium wine producing region located in the northwest corner of the United States. Although a relatively young wine industry, it is now the nation's second largest wine producer and is ranked among the world's top wine regions. Washington wines are found nationally in all 50 states and internationally in more than 40 countries.

Varieties
Washington produces more than 20 wine grape varieties - a ratio of 56 percent white to 44 percent red. As the industry matures and experiments, it finds many grape varieties that thrive throughout Washington's microclimates. There are more than 16,000 vineyard acres of red wine varieties statewide.

History & Vintages
Washington's wine future is limitless. As consumers discover the quality of Washington wines, demand continues to grow nationally and internationally. New acreage and wine varietals are being planted and new wineries are opening at a remarkable pace. Washington State is recognized as a premium viticultural region around the world.

State Facts
Washington's wine industry generates more than $3 billion to the state economy. It employs more than 14,000 people, directly and indirectly, with projections to add nearly 2,000 more jobs by 2006. In terms of tax revenues accrued to the state and federal government, wine grapes are among the highest tax generators of any agricultural crops. Furthermore, Washington wine tourism attracts nearly two million visitors annually contributing to the positive growth of local and regional economies.

Washington State - the perfect climate for wine = ideal growing conditions, quality wines, business innovation, lifestyle, and social responsibility. All are key elements of this world-class wine industry.

Region

: Eger
Revision 2: edited by fries on 10/14/2012 (view)
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Region

: Central Valley
Revision 4: edited by Eric on 8/12/2012 (view)

Region

: Mosel Saar Ruwer
Revision 10: edited by Eric on 5/14/2012 (view)
Starting in 2007 the German wine authorities have changed labeling laws to rename all of the Mosel-Saar-Ruwer wines to just "Mosel." This puts this and other database driven sites in a difficult spot, as millions of old wine label reflect the former labeling. As described here, CellarTracker has elected to remain with the old labeling for a number of years to avoid confusion. At some point we will switch over to just "Mosel" but not for a few years at least.
Mosel WeinKulturland (Moselwein e.V.)

Detailed geographical information at weinlagen.info

Region

: Lombardia
Revision 1: edited by iByron on 4/3/2012 (view)

Region

: Veneto
Revision 8: edited by Eric on 1/14/2012 (view)
Credit to WineCountry.it for this article

History and Tradition
The first human settlements of the lagoon and the surrounding areas maintained a simple social structure until the arrival of the Romans in the second century B.C. who divided the land into parcels of about 4,800 square meters and distributed those tracts among the locals to be cultivated.

The Romans founded the cities of Verona, Vicenza, and Padova, and named what was then the 10th imperial region, Venetia. Both the Veneto region and the province of Venice (Venezia in Italian) derive their names from the original Latin name of the area. The precursor of the city of Venice that we know today was founded during the Middle Ages when the locals escaped the barbaric invasions that followed the decline of the Roman Empire by taking refuge in coastal areas, islands, and the lagoon’s marshland.

The Venetian trade routes that connected Europe with Asia brought great wealth and general prosperity to the region. In many provinces, especially around Treviso, mulberry cultivation and the breeding of silkworms imported from China brought more affluence and prestige to local residents. With money pouring in from all quarters, Venice began its great building projects, chief among them creating the lagoon and canal infrastructure and systems still enjoyed and used today.

Between the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th centuries following the opening of the Suez Canal, Venice once again became an important port city. Foreign investment financed the creation of the industrial infrastructure of Porto Marghera and freed the port of Venice from the burden of commercial navigation. Improved communications technology has allowed the rest of Italy and the world beyond closer ties to Venice, and has contributed to making Venice into an incomparable tourist destination.

The long period of power and splendor that blessed Venice encouraged the highest quality creations by local artisans. The ongoing request for jewelry, precious fabrics, lace, glass, wood and ceramic products by the noble Venetians shaped the development of typical stores along the narrow calli (streets) of Venice as well as factories both inland and on the lagoon islands. Up to today, popular tourist destinations are the Murano and Burano islands, famed for their glasswork and needlepoint products.

The Wines
Veneto is among the foremost wine-producing regions, both for quality and quantity. The region counts over 20 DOC zones and a variety of sub-categories, many of its wines, both dry and Spumanti, are internationally known and appreciated.

The three most well known DOCs are Bardolino, from the town with the same name and surrounding the shores of Garda Lake, Valpolicella, and Soave. Other noteworthy wines produced here are the white Bianco di Custoza, the excellent sparkling Prosecco, the Breganze, and the Amarone (a rich and powerful red from the Verona province). If you travel to the Treviso area, look for the little-known Clinton, a wine that is banned from distribution because it does not conform to the DOC standards, but is produced in limited quantities for local consumption.

The importance of winemaking in this region is underscored by the creation in 1885 of the very first Italian school for vine growing and oenology. In addition, Veneto was the first region to constitute the first strada del vino or "wine road". This first wine-touring road featured special road signs providing information on vines and the wines they were made into and joined the Valdobbiadene and Conegliano DOC zones crossing a series of hilly vineyards.

The most appreciated wines in the region come from the provinces of Treviso, Verona, Padova, Venice, and Vicenza. The area around Verona, with its temperate climate and hilly surrounding, is believed to have cultivated grapes since the Bronze Age.

Region

: Galicia
Revision 5: edited by PeterMadrid on 1/9/2012 (view)
Galicia is an autonomous region in the northwestern corner of Spain, north of Portugal. It is marked by an atlantic climate with frequent rain and moderate temperatures, especially along the coastal regions. There are five Denominación de Origen (DO) areas: Monterrei, Rías Baixas, Ribeira Sacra, Ribeiro and Valdeorras. Probably the best known wines are the Albariño wines from Rias Baixas, but all regions have seen increased interest in recent years. There has been also a notable resurgence of local grapes, like Godello, Treixadura or Loureiro.

Region

: Alsace
Revision 9: edited by charlie11 on 12/20/2011 (view)
Vins d'Alsace (Conseil Interprofessionnel des Vins d'Alsace)

Please see the AlsaceEntryGuide for more information how the wines of Alsace are entered and organized in CellarTracker.
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