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Wednesday, August 21, 2013 - David Goldfarb called me over in the afternoon spur of the moment to share this bottle to see how it was given my comments to him recently that all my experiences with '69s, dating back to my first one around '98 or '99, revealed a rather appley and oxidative wine across both Demi-Secs and Moelleux from both Le Mont and Clos du Bourg. Well, David's had his bottle stored longer than all but one of the bottles I'd previously tried and, indeed, this bottle lacked the intense oxidative and baked apple character of most of those have shown. Aromatically, the wine didn't thrill me. It lacked fruit, aside from a little bit of appleliness, and was dominated by earth aromas, but lacked freshness. On the palate, it was a interesting roller coaster of a ride that lasted about two hours. Neither David nor I were particularly impressed with the wine from the get go as it was unfocused, plump and showed its sugar easily. However, after spending a bit more time in the decanter, the wine came into focus with the acidity brightening up and the sweetness moving more into the Demi-Sec range. Pleasant apple, persimmon and peanut flavors emerged with nice earthiness. About an hour or so in, the wine momentarily took off. There was a terrific intensity to it, the sweetness moved back into the Moelleux range, the fruit was vibrant. Just clicking on all cylinders. However, that high lasted only about twenty minutes before the wine visibly aged in the mouth. The fruit receded, earth notes started to dominate with a light bitter note and the finish dropped off. At its peak, I'd call it an A-/B+. Overall, though, I think the wine is definitely showing its age and is a bit tired, so call it a Low B+. It was fun to chart the wine's ups and downs over two hours, though. Most informative.

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