Tasting Notes for jvogel

(418 notes on 359 wines)

1 - 50 of 418 Sort order
Red
8/28/2012 - jvogel wrote:
Blind Southern Rhone Lineup: Dark, but not opaque garnet robe, with a 1mm clear meniscus. Bread crust nuances on the nose, accompanied by cheese rind, custard, cigar box, currant and Bing cherry. A very vigorous, mouth-coating texture, and a lingering finish full of cherry, blackberry, all-spice and anise. The deep, backwoods feel of the nose and palate--woody, tobacco, licorice and cherry--made me think erroneously of Rasteau. At this point it was a process of elimination based on my assessment and classification of the other wines. Reading through the notes again, it's very clear this wine evokes all that makes Gigondas so special, so magnetic. Missing here are the frequent white pepper, cacao and espresso notes I find in ripe Rasteau.
Red
8/28/2012 - jvogel wrote:
Blind Southern Rhone Lineup: Much darker than the Charbonniere HdB '07--opaque, deep crimson, and nearly indiscernible meniscus. Aromas of reglisse, wet leather and wet horse, blueberry syrup, lavender and Kalimata olives. Vibrant, energetic flavors, acid-rich, zingy alcohol, supple but abundant tannin, black cherry, herbes de Provence, and cranberry concentrate. I made a casual assumption based on the wine's concentration and posture that this was southern sector cuvee speciale CdP. Wrong. Christophe Delorme's 2007 Domaine de la Mordoree Lirac Cuvee de la Reine des Bois. This is in a great place right now--what a wine. And I paid 17 Euro for it on a fire-sale. Awesome.
Red
8/25/2012 - jvogel wrote:
Blind Southern Rhone Lineup: Vibrant ruby, translucent, clear 1-2mm meniscus. Crisp bacon aromas, garrigue, pomegranate, dried cherry and cranberry, and cedary top notes. Tart flavor dynamic, sinewy structure, layered within a framework of Red Man, blackberry, Nibs and sweet jerky. Secondary impressions after a few hours on air: horse-y nose, brett and barnyard, brussel sprouts (sauteed). Interesting wine that I certainly didn't peg as a CdP Cuvee Speciale. Very much a northern sector expression of CdP--cool(er) climate characteristics, which prompted an assumption this was higher elevation Gigondas.
White
5/26/2012 - jvogel wrote:
A bit rough around the edges right now, with a bitter and clipped finish. Not entirely sure where this is in its evolution, but it doesn't seem too sure-footed. Hold.
Red
12/10/2011 - jvogel wrote:
Syrah in a singular paradigm, at once silent and monastic, then practically oozing charm and playfulness. Without question, this is Syrah that waxes reductive, closing in on itself and wielding wild notes of graphite and turpentine. This was, however, a wine of serious complexity, growing deep and intoxicating with opposing notes of sappy blackberry, currant and Blue Mountain coffee, just as quickly as it clamped down on itself, sputtering out with camphor, beef jerky and olive tapenade. This was beguiling, haunting stuff: great acidity, developed tannin and pillowy mouthfeel… I’m glad I have a few more bottles laying around. A long decant is recommended, as is a slightly lower serving temp than ambient room or even cellar temp.
Red
12/10/2011 - jvogel wrote:
A wine of peculiar brilliance and profundity given the vintage’s reputation. While a cuvee, with some 20% Syrah and 10% Mourvedre, the predominant characteristic here is the influence of Grenache grown in sand–in this case, the lieu-dit of Pignan. Very often these wines bear impressions of white chocolate or vanilla, often joining forces with zippy raspberry and cola, gritty (almost sandy, for lack of more appropriate wording) tannin and minerally weight that seems to cling for dear life from it. To me, these are the real deal Grenache-dominant wines of the southern Rhone, great cousins of Julien Barrot’s Cuvee Pure, Emmanuel Reynaud’s Chateau Rayas, and Domaine de Cristia’s Cuvee Vieilles Vignes. It was hard to believe this Chloris (formerly Secret de Pignan) was from 2008, but certainly its cool poise and taut demeanor bear hallmarks of the vintage’s cantankerous nature. Stark acidity, some back-end bite and rigidity, and volatile front-end sweetness certainly scream “off vintage”; but in many ways, these drawbacks are also the wine’s great virtue, leaning more toward the cooler climate earthiness and red-fruited snap of Burgundy and southern Germany. That excites me, as it’s a welcome departure from where I see Chateauneuf-du-Pape so frequently going these days.
White
11/19/2011 - jvogel wrote:
A playful melange of cascading tropical and citrus fruit, a hint of soft but resounding oak and a clean, deliberate finish. We zeroed this out like soda through a straw.
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Red
2007 Graci Etna Rosso Etna DOC Nerello Mascalese (view label images)
11/19/2011 - jvogel wrote:
Mono-varietal Nerello Mascalese originating from the north slopes of Sicily's Mount Etna. Core of the earth nose here, and parallel depth, with baked fig newton and cherry pie aromas entangled in a briny mist that lay fog-like on this clearly maritime red. The flavors are equally deep, a long fault-line of flavor not unlike the magical fault-inspired reds of David Hirsch. This, however, goes a step further, ratcheting up the weight and milky sweetness of ripe acid and setting the stage for a broad swath of still jagged blackberry compote and sanguine, iron-rich notes of marrow and anise. A very complete and intricate red, with all the muscle of 14.5% abv, and all the snap and vigor of north-facing, November-harvested fruit. I should have bought truck-loads of this, but I was buying blind. As a side note, this needed a full 24 hours at half-bottle to open up, so prolonged decants are advised if you find this killer Sicilian lurking in your neighborhood.
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Red
11/6/2011 - jvogel wrote:
Lots of deep tones, but more raw and edgy. Lots of kirsch, ganache, licorice, and floral top notes complete the nose on this youngster. The palate, while not exactly brutal, is quite brawny. Lots of tannin nestled in a thicket full of bramble, damson, blueberry, bacon and mesquite. This needs a bit of time in bottle still, and could stand a few hours on air if consumed now. I love what the Sabon’s have done with their 2009 harvest. I'm placing this smack in the middle of their 2009 hierarchy, the VV leading the pack and Chaupin a very tight third.
Red
11/4/2011 - jvogel wrote:
This has expanded dramatically since last I tasted it (2007). This is now rich, round and deep, an almost fondue-like sensation of dripping dark chocolate, dried cherry and raspberry, all mounted on a sturdy frame of long, mature tannin and juicy plum acidity. This is one for Thanksgiving–just pure, elegant, crowd-pleasing power (if that makes sense).
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White - Sparkling
10/30/2011 - jvogel wrote:
This just keeps getting better and better. Almost like a solid right now, hewn from the very chalk of Champagne itself. Incomprehensible fruit concentration. Love this.
Red
10/15/2011 - jvogel wrote:
This is quite massive right now, the oak components feeling a bit out of balance relative to the inherent fruit. There’s no question this wine is destined for greatness — all the ingredients are there — but there’s that makeup that needs to be washed off before we can really get down to the meat of what’s beautiful here. It’s all Syrah right now, no Viognier florality or spark, but I can sense what’s lurking underneath, primarily because there’s a gracefulness here, a lack of the raisined sur maturité that so frequently accompanies wines (and/or winemakers) that try too hard. If Morgan knew there was something special going on here, I trust he was intelligent enough to know to back off. I believe he’s done that. Right now this is all Latin American arabica, beef jerky, soy and hickory smoke. While that may sound like a wild combo, it’s superb, but just a bit too much on the wild side, brazen and unformed...for now, at least.
Red
2006 Castello dei Rampolla Chianti Classico Chianti Classico DOCG Sangiovese Blend, Sangiovese (view label images)
10/14/2011 - jvogel wrote:
This Chianti was interesting, a razor sharp expression of Tuscan fruit–warm, brutal at times, loaded with the spice cabinet and all manner of sour cherries and ripe red tomatoes. It was desperate for food, and it got it. I was glad for that. On its own, I’d say this may be a bit big for its britches.
White - Off-dry
10/23/2011 - jvogel wrote:
This Mosel Riesling Spaetlese is clearly a product of its vintage--2005 was a crop of towering, profound quality, producing wines of insane, almost monolithic concentration. While still massive and full of extract, this has started to unravel with loads of rich and hearty acid and sinewy layers of exotic tropical fruits, honey and lemon custard. Right now this is all about decadent pleasure, but it doesn’t slack on complexity either.
White
10/22/2011 - jvogel wrote:
While this white Chateauneuf was a bit taxing in the booze department–14% abv–it was enough of an acidic powerhouse to give that key sense of refreshment. Something wonderful is going on at this estate (Philippe Cambie consults…). This had real backbone, supporting a billowy frame of tree nuts, apricot, young honeydew and jonathan apple. There’s also a piney note to this as well–Pine-sol, if I may–with that twist of lemon twang to give that nice finishing touch.
Red
10/11/2011 - jvogel wrote:
It’s almost hard to believe this is Gamay Noir. A huge, billowy nose full of mesquite, warm raspberry preserves, molten rock and the exuberant florality for which Fleurie is famous. I suspected the palate would never match the personality of the nose on this wine. I was wrong. This over-delivered with a rich, structured palate full of chiseled granite spark, blackberry and plum, some bitter chocolate notes married to a kiss of coffee bean, more mesquite notes and touch of fruit pit. There’s a great line of tannin here, rather brilliant in the way it frames some of the more obvious Gamay characteristics, keeping them from grinding precipitously toward confectionary, Duboeuf-y territory. If you can still find this wine on the market, it’s a slam-dunk. For what I paid (13 Euro), it’s practically a daily drinker. Thankfully, this was NOT my last bottle of this gem.
Red
10/7/2011 - jvogel wrote:
Thin and challenging. I’d had another bottle in late 2009, which was incredibly rich and structured, but in a gentle, velvet way — the way that makes Pinot Noir so addictive and magical. This was not the magical experience I remember. I’m not entirely sure what’s going on here, and I can’t tell what will happen in the future — this was my last bottle.
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White
10/5/2011 - jvogel wrote:
This was full of gala and granny smith apple notes — juicy, honeyed, subdued citrus notes verging on the tropical. Very taut structure, very formed and impressive in all the right spots. Despite the typical Rheingau size, this finished with lots of silky vanilla and coconut milk notes.
White
10/6/2011 - jvogel wrote:
While I remain an intense, devoted fan of this producer, this wine didn’t show well. It came across very hollow and aggressive — too much acid, not enough balanced, succulent fruit. I don’t know if this was an off bottle, or if this is just in an awkward phase. Either way, I expected something much more forward and brilliant; instead, I got a pit bull stuck in a dark corner with strangers in the room.
Red
9/23/2011 - jvogel wrote:
Aromas of biscuit and clay, like kiln pottery, alongside sage and cumin with inflections of arabica bean and iodine. Then this grows even more complex with raspberry liqueur and drafty cola. Provencal scrub comes and goes. This reminded me very much of the Grenache notes in Mme. Diffonty's 2006 Cuvee du Vatican Reserve Sixtine. Both are quite modern expressions of Chateauneuf-du-Pape; however, the Sixtine is a Grenache and Syrah cuvee. But both see new barrique, which gives the Cornelia Constanza a rich and round mouthfeel, as well as a savory, chunky mid-palate that slides effortlessly to the dusty, mocha-infused finish. Gobs of spice, gobs of character...gobs of Grenache. Just brilliant.
Red
9/23/2011 - jvogel wrote:
This presents with overt licorice and some evidence of whole-cluster fermentation. I don't know if this was done, but the spicy scrub-brush garrigue notes here are deep and baroque. The smell of stem is evident within the herb melange, as are the juicy currant and raspberry notes. On the palate, this 100% Grenache from 60-year-old vines sings with marasca cherry, raspberry and flashy cranberry, all layered on top of juicy filet mignon and warm leather notes. This is the essence of Provence. Period.
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Red
9/23/2011 - jvogel wrote:
The nose was the most interesting part here: sandalwood, tobacco, prosciutto, blueberry-meets-blackberry and red licorice. The palate echoed the nose, but with less volume and some dried 'shroom, fennel and cinnamon in the mix. For the price, this was sensational ($8). Really solid structure, a thin but still rather expansive tannic layer married to healthy acid.
Red
2006 Château d'Armailhac Pauillac Red Bordeaux Blend (view label images)
9/21/2011 - jvogel wrote:
Sadly, this was extremely lean and austere, the acid completely overwhelming what little juicy fruit may have been there in the first place. This never relented--not in the decanter, not in the bottle, not in a huge Bordeaux Riedel. This either needs considerably longer in bottle than I expected, or this may never resolve, no matter my degree of patience.
Red
9/20/2011 - jvogel wrote:
Such playful, delicious, easy-going fruit, but an undertow of limey grit that reminds me so much of Bernhard Huber's Hecklinger Schlossberg Pinot Noir from Baden, Germany. The chalky lime gives this great structure, harnessing the red-fruited acid and lending a sense of filigree to the velvety bramble and damson notes that linger in the balanced finish. Herr Huber would be proud of this Kiwi.
Red
9/12/2011 - jvogel wrote:
For the price ($12), I thought this was a very pure expression of a great grape: lots of juicy, acid-rich fruit–cherries, plum and blackberry–with a nice velvet texture that showed up after this was open for a day. This even managed to keep its fruit-forward integrity through day 3, and a nice meaty jerky note also emerged, alongside a warm leather finish. Very interesting stuff for the budget-minded.
Red
9/11/2011 - jvogel wrote:
This opened with some very interesting notes of damp forest floor and sauteed ‘shrooms, fresh-picked cherry, mom’s herb and spice rack next to the sink, and a mysterious and penetrating smell I still can’t put my finger on. The Roessler was quite effusive on the palate, but not exactly focused. It continued its raspy expression of the spice rack on the palate, and even chimed in with notes of cedar and clove, buried in the lingering notes of red fruit that make cooler-climate Pinot so deelish. I’d love to revisit this in one to two year’s time.
Red
9/18/2011 - jvogel wrote:
This is far from the spoof zone, as far as maps are concerned. In fact, this was so far off the map I never actually tasted anything in this. I could tell it was wine–ethanol and gargantuan acid structure–but the aromas and flavors were so compact, so defiant, that no matter how vigorously I swirled I couldn’t coax one single smile or frown from this recalcitrant booger. I’m hoping for a change of heart on Day 2; so very strange to have a grape so typically expressive to show so inverted.

This was markedly better on Day 2, but I wouldn't say it was as great as it will certainly be in two to three years time. This needs lots of love in the decanter if opened now. Wow, what incredible acid.
Red
9/18/2011 - jvogel wrote:
This was subtle; in fact, so much so that it tasted like one big unified ball of grape juice concentrate, alcohol-ified. There were no “Ecken und Kanten”, as the Germans say, no corners or rough edges, no character, no zip or drive or energy. Just a lifeless wine that certainly tasted like fermented grapes but nothing else. A wine in stasis, or a wine on its way to the next world. I’ve got one more, so we’ll see if this is just a phase…I hope it is.
White
9/16/2011 - jvogel wrote:
A seriously pungent expression of gun-metal, guava and grapefruit. Lots of exotic notes on this beast, and I couldn’t help admiring how feral this was. My wife’s first words were, “This tastes like today.” It was an overcast and windswept day, lifting every bit of dirt and fresh cut grass from our backyard, the eventual heat of the sun coaxing moisture from the earth. This is the Sauvignon Blanc I feel wins hearts and minds: a singular expression of a grape that may or may not be deliberately harvested under-ripe to bring this strange melange of tropical notes, flint and lemongrass. Regardless of these decisions, this remains an exceedingly refreshing wine, full of nuance, and yet still bubbling over with the glory of the obvious.
Red
9/5/2011 - jvogel wrote:
An intense Grenache-heavy blend coming from the far northern reaches of the appellation, and from the highest parcels–between 250 and 400 meters. This is yet another wine revealing its cool-climate personality: electrifying acid structure, rich, ripe red fruit notes and a leathery finish more indicative of its Mourvedre component than the satisfyingly plump and round Grenache notes. I think this still needs a bit of time to round out, but I’ve also had other bottles of this that were locked and loaded. Advice: Decant. Two hours would be fine–the Mourvedre seems to have the fruit in a headlock now, which bodes well for aging. Not all headlocks are bad I guess.
Red
9/7/2011 - jvogel wrote:
Yet another lovely wine with European sensibilities. I didn’t take too many formal notes–well, none actually, other than mental ones–but I remember this being a bit raw still…in a good way. Evidence of whole-cluster fermentation, cool(er)-climate structure and, of course, insightful winemaking. Buy.
Red
9/5/2011 - jvogel wrote:
Great varietal aroma, no rough edges–acid and ripeness all in composed balance–and ripe. Not over-ripe, not barely ripe: ripe. It was so nice to have Cabernet like that, and this hopefully sheds light not only on how great a vintage 2007 was when not overly exploited, but also perhaps a new stylistic vanguard within the ranks of higher case-production wineries. If that’s really the case, I’m all in. One taster mentioned a degree of acid not usually seen in Cali Cabs; I agree. This acid was intense, which I'm quite fond of, so long as it's not protruding into the "we obviously acidified this year" territory (which I hope is not the case here). I'm really confounded by James Laube's 80 point score for this over at the Spectator. Then again, this is the same guy who tastes verticals of over-hyped wines with the producers themselves present and accounted for. So I wouldn't exactly say the 80 points is an objective, credible score, for all you score-hounds out there who may have passed on this wine on account of the plonk-ish rating.
Red
8/16/2011 - jvogel wrote:
Yup, still great. Wish I'd bought a lot more. Too late now I'm afraid...
Red
8/26/2011 - jvogel wrote:
I was absolutely stunned by this, speechless and breathless. An utterly classic 100% Grenache, this was brimming with brett and cheesy funk (it blew off), allspice on bread pudding, black cherry and currants covered in freshly tilled earth, and an inexplicable note of purity I seem to find in nearly all of these successful low/no sulfur wines. And what a mouthful! This was huge, but diplomatically so. In fact, its only corollary–at least in my limited tasting history–is Henri Bonneau’s entry-level Chateauneuf du Pape. The two are strikingly similar, Gramenon with perhaps less of la Crau’s flamboyant réglisse and cassis, but more star anise and toast crust than you get with Bonneau. A hardly acknowledged epidemic in the wine world–vanishing mid-palate weight and structure–has yet to strike here. Profound density prevails throughout, the rich sweetness of Grenache balanced by the horse-y, garrigue nature of a deeply rooted southern Rhone gem. Another riveting example of what the otherwise pedestrian Cotes du Rhone AOC can be in the hands of the willing and capable.
Red
2009 Michel Gassier Cercius Côtes du Rhône Red Rhone Blend (view label images)
7/26/2011 - jvogel wrote:
A Grenache-heavy southern Rhone blend (85%/15% Syrah) from the village of Visan, the top of the Cairanne-Rasteau triangle. An Eric Solomon wine produced in conjunction with Michel Gassier and ubiquitous consultant Philippe Cambie, this stands courageously against a relentless tide of paint-by-number Cotes du Rhones. Typical Grenache notes of raspberry, black cherry and licorice married cordially with the Syrah component’s strident pepper and Slim Jim notes. I loved this because it was honest and naked, a real reflection of Visan, vinified neutrally in Inox and cement tank, farmed lutte raisonée, and truly influenced by the mistral winds for which the wine is named.
Rosé
7/25/2011 - jvogel wrote:
I didn’t dig too deeply into the nuances of this wine, but I did take note of its brilliant salmon color and how powerfully the wine smelled of fresh grapefruit, the kind Grandpa H. had with breakfast every morning. The flavors had more to do with Bandol than with rosé in its more familiar iterations. Flinty flavors persisted throughout, giving structure to a very floral, very briny wine full of prickly blood orange, herbes de Provence, and mom’s tiny garden strawberries. A quaffer for sure, but one I’d guzzle with a Schildknecht, not a Sheen.
White
7/25/2011 - jvogel wrote:
The unmistakable smell of a sur lie wine mingled effortlessly with primary notes of bosc pear, lime and fresh OJ. On the palate, the wine remained quite taut and linear. I dare say one could mistake a great young Muscadet for a terribly young, sinewy and dry German riesling, one without the fat and gristle of so many of its Grosses Gewaechs incarnations. I was most impressed by the finish here–salt, citrus and melon rind–and the aromatic framework, a lattice of lofty Atlantic coast smells, wet stones after a summer storm, and a diminutive sap note that persisted after an hour or so of being open.
White - Sparkling
7/27/2011 - jvogel wrote:
This was a big lip-smacking sugary energy drink for hard-working Italian grapeslingers. I’m not too familiar with Moscato, but I assumed one from such an esteemed producer as Vajra would be at least interesting, compelling. While it was certainly interesting, I’m no longer compelled to reach impulsively for the next bottle. Too much sweetness for me. But for others, this could be a perfect summertime sipper. To each his own.
Rosé
8/1/2011 - jvogel wrote:
I can understand how this acquired its loyal, cultish following. It’s fresh, inviting, focused and snappy. A bit of fizz stirs the palate’s tendency to just lap this up, gulp after gulp. Strawberries galore–about the most focused representation of said fruit in any rosé I’ve tasted to date. Certainly a coastal wine–briny, salty sea breeze style–perfectly suited to the kaleidoscope of Mediterranean/Atlantic flavors and textures.
Red
8/26/2011 - jvogel wrote:
I was immediately impressed with this German Pinot Noir's nose of violets, toffee syrup and sappy cedar–it seems to be aging gracefully. The color is only now leaning toward auburn near the rim. The satin-laced acidity brings this wine into focus, something this wine has occasionally lacked. Flavors of black cherry, currant and damson resound through a vibrant, juicy finish. Nothing clipped here.
Red
8/1/2011 - jvogel wrote:
This LaPierre Morgon (N) was obstinate and monotone. I could barely coax a conversation with it. I figured I’d encounter some dumb wines post-shipping (especially the sans soufre ones), but I needed to know soon whether I’d need to report damage beyond just some bottle-shocked wines. But this Morgon was a smash day 2. Incredibly focused, pure crystalline red fruit nose, like that of candy store licorice ropes. Mmmmm. All fear escaped me like a doctor’s office exhale. Ripe, effusive tannin and granitic tones highlighted a palate practically smoldering with honey-glazed bacon, seared peaches and cinnamon-heavy bread pudding. It was unreal–more and more fruit came bubbling to the top: blueberry, greengage and boysenberry were igniting everywhere. An almost impossibly gorgeous wine in need of another three to four years to really settle into stunning adolescence.
Red
8/2/2011 - jvogel wrote:
From the start, this Pinot Noir was almost violently rustic and stemmy, with bramble and damson almost engulfed by plowed earth and beefeaters. Not a Day 1 star, but I had a hunch this would be spectacular on Day 2. It didn’t disappoint. Having shed its cloak of oak and loam, this became a basket full of wild blueberries, plum and dried cran. Firm but pliant tannin integrated perfectly with ripe acidity, and the finish cascaded with spicy notes of leather, clove and anise. If you’re set on killing this Day 1, decant, decant, decant.
Red
8/2/2011 - jvogel wrote:
This screamed red fruits—cranberries, cherries and raspberries. But this undertow of cedar, cashmere tannin and sweet earth gave me chills. There was something very rooted about this wine—rich and primary, no doubt, with a very natural persistence of mid-palate weight, but influenced mostly by something for which I can only conjure a parallel: the wines of Birkweiler in Germany’s Pfalz wine-growing region. Here the richly hued sandstone yields grapes of surreal depth and volume, gorgeous raspberry and black cherry fruit flavors, and an impenetrable sense of place. Some would call it minerality. I would call it Birkweiler. Same goes for the wild and restless West Sonoma Coast.
Red
8/8/2011 - jvogel wrote:
This is such fun juice: loads of black cherry, pastille and hookah. There is certainly the density that comes with alluvial fruit, but it’s not distracting, and it follows through in the finish. With many a $23 wine, the hard-hitting stuff often comes at the tip of the tongue, leaving a gaping hole mid-palate and a clipped, bitter finish. The folks at Beringer seem to have solved both issues (Merlot/P. Verdot?).
Red
8/8/2011 - jvogel wrote:
Gamay from M-a-V has to be the most dense, compact rendition of the grape, and Brun renders it without chaptalization, 71B or stems. Shoot, some of the wines are even rendered without appellation status (hooray AOC! Yew is smartt!). Quite meaty with a riveting sense of acidity and more red than black fruit perking this up. A pinch of bark and more than a pinch of granitic focus lend some wilderness to this. Right now, the tannin is buried but perceptible. Transcendent fruit here, yet it retains noticeable structure and torque.
Red
8/8/2011 - jvogel wrote:
This carried its 14.4% alcohol effortlessly. At first whiff, this was a freshly carved porterhouse, cool and bloody. Lots of Twizzlers, too--in a good way--studded with pink peppercorn and coffee grounds. The flavors were expansive but never gloppy or overblown. There was certainly the sheen of a polished wine, but that never detracted from its burly, seismic proportions. Stunning inner-mouth perfume of violets and gingerbread with a masterpiece finish, echoing the keen sense of precision I detected from the moment I opened this.
Red
8/8/2011 - jvogel wrote:
A progressive approach to Chateauneuf du Pape, with a 50/50 Grenache-Syrah mix. The Syrah matures in 100% new barrique, with the final assemblage spending more time in new oak. I find the treatment heavy-handed. The grace and pungency of healthy, ripe Grenache is indiscernible here, and the Syrah exudes next to no signature varietal flavor: no pepper, no meat, no tapenade–nothing but vanilla, aromas of sur maturite and ethanol. I suspect the fruit is nearly if not totally exhausted now. Sadly, my enthusiasm for this wine is waning fast. I'd hoped for better, vis-a-vis my 1/9/2011 note. Wild, the progression of this wine in just seven months exactly. Travel jitters...???
White
8/15/2011 - jvogel wrote:
Solid chardonnay from the Cote Chalonnaise. This was Lemon Drops in liquid form. Great acidity, a wine with real food affinity. If I were opening this again right now, I’d decant it.
White - Off-dry
8/26/2011 - jvogel wrote:
We drank this too fast to gather solid notes, but that tells you this was good! Extremely complex, extremely chuggable; slightly sweet, but in a mango and white honey kind of way, not an Equal-in-your-Coke sweet.
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