Comments on my notes

(26 comments on 21 notes)

1 - 21 of 21 Sort order
Red
2010 1789 Wines Pinot Noir Willamette Valley
Brett for days. Too much brett for me. Didn't finish the bottle.
  • chambolle commented:

    11/25/20, 3:47 PM - I’ve had this wine half a dozen times since release, last time probably two years ago; ‘brett’ has never been in the picture. I plan to open a bottle on Turkey Day 2020 - the Franco-American reference seems Thanksgiving appropriate, as well as an even decade since the vintage. We’ll see whether ‘brett’ makes an unwelcome appearance.

White - Sparkling
N.V. Egly-Ouriet Champagne Premier Cru Brut "Les Vignes de Vrigny" Pinot Meunier
11/29/2019 - drwine2001 wrote:
100% Pinot Meunier. Odd, funky, herbal aromas. Medium weight, difficult to describe flavors other than to say that they not pleasing. I generally have a difficult time understanding and appreciating Meunier-based Champagnes, and unfortunately, this was no exception.
  • chambolle commented:

    3/4/20, 1:54 PM - Not sure the disgorge date or provenance of your bottle; but I recently took delivery of a dozen of these disgorged July 2018. Both bottles were fresh, effusively fruity, straight ahead, just incredibly ‘gulpable,’ a wine that is just all right now, like a really good bottle of Fleurie. It was fabulous to drink as an aperitif and then with sautéed cod and belgian endive in a butter/blood orange sauce, served over creamy polenta.

    Perhaps you had an off bottle?

  • chambolle commented:

    3/4/20, 4:49 PM - Inexplicable... but then that’s wine. Perhaps I’ve just got a weird palate; or perhaps you do; or some combination of the two? I drink quite a lot of grower champagne and am fond of the Egly wines, esp. VP and Rosé. I’d never tried the Vrigny meunier until recently and found it really charming. Not deep, complex or majestic in any way. Just flat out charming - and that’s plenty good for me most days.

White - Sparkling
N.V. Egly-Ouriet Champagne Premier Cru Brut "Les Vignes de Vrigny" Pinot Meunier
9/23/2019 - RajivAyyangar wrote:
91 points
MNB: Sparkling II (Home (Noe st)): (blind)
Medium gold color.
Phenomenally expressive briochey nose, with baked apple pie crust notes (oxidative style, some age, plenty of autolysis). Fine mousse. More pinot-y - weighty. No malo - sharp acidic finish.
Brut (8g RS), high + acid. Long finish with toasty coffee notes of aged autolysis. Not sure if there's oak - I can't distinguish it from the autolytic notes.

3-5 years on lees.

Some age - maybe vintage champagne from 2005-7?

91

Actually - Egly-Ouriet, 36 months on lees, disgorged 2017.
12.5%
100% Meunier
Brut (6 to 12 g/L)
1-5 year barrels.

Analysis - this seems prematurely aged. (From BottleBarn)
  • chambolle commented:

    9/25/19, 11:11 PM - Not sure what you mean by ‘brut 6-12 g/L’; but if you are referring to the dosage, this is typically at about 2-3 g/L, at least that’s what Egly owns up to.

Red
1999 Comte Armand Pommard 1er Cru Clos des Epeneaux Pinot Noir
3/30/2019 - d'Auvenay Likes this wine:
93 points
In Jeroboam. Decanted for 4 hrs and consumed in 3 hrs. Spicy aromas and still plenty of tannins. Rich round with chocolate and full-body fruits. Too young for now. Let's put aside 5-10 yrs for regular size and 10-15 yrs for larger format.
  • chambolle commented:

    4/20/19, 4:09 PM - “Decanted for 4 yrs”? I’m guessing that’s not what you meant.

Red
2008 Domaine du Château de Chorey (Germain) Beaune 1er Cru Vignes Franches Vieilles Vignes Pinot Noir
9/16/2018 - diggydan wrote:
Furniture drinking tonight, unfortunately.
  • chambolle commented:

    3/13/19, 3:45 PM - Furniture?

  • chambolle commented:

    3/17/19, 8:09 PM - That’s an allusion that went right past me; but seeing the explanation now, the ‘unfortunately’ makes sense.

Red
2007 Domaine des Comtes Lafon Volnay 1er Cru Santenots-Du-Milieu Pinot Noir
3/21/2014 - drwine2001 wrote:
I last had this almost 4 years ago, and while it had many of the same elements, these had come together in a wonderful and unexpected way. Translucent ruby, evenly colored. As before, it started with intense rose florality, which gradually gave way to tart cherry and strong anise. Slightly heavier and oakier than my ideal for Volnay, but these traits also backed down with air and revealed an airier wine not so affected by the wood. Pungent red fruit, sharp but not terribly high acidity, and a fine thread of minerality and soil that were less obvious in 2010. I've had mixed emotions about this bottling over many vintages, but in the end, I must say that this was one of the most gorgeous examples I've tried. No, it does not have the pared down purity of Angerville, but at this point, this is quite an exciting Volnay. Maybe for this cuvee, less is more, and 2007 is the right vintage for the style.

The next day, the remainder of the bottle showed even rounder fruit with some bitter chocolate notes. This is a strikingly voluminous, rich 2007.
  • chambolle commented:

    2/16/19, 10:42 AM - Your note perfectly captures my experience with this wine. Over the years I’ve found the Lafon Volnays more than a little heavy handed and atypical for the appellation (Coates “Vine” consistently loved them and rated them highly, and before spending some time tasting with him in Burgundy I had not understood why - he’s a lifelong cigarette smoker). But this ‘07 iteration of Santenots is fragrant and rich without excessive weight, actually a very beautiful bottle of wine at 10 - 12 years from the vintage. With global warming, perhaps we need to value these more delicate, less structured vintages more highly than the ever more common warm years that yield up rich, ripe, dense wines, which aren’t what Burgundy at its best is about.

White - Fortified
N.V. Pérez Barquero Montilla-Moriles 1905 Solera Amontillado Pedro Ximénez
6/30/2007 - Mlermontov wrote:
96 points
David Bowler Spanish Tasting - (will be) LOOOONG; 6/27/2007-7/3/2007: yeah... 1905.. amontillado..from Montilla... not too many things in life are better than this!...salty, nutty, literally explodes in your mouth, screams acidity and power. finish doesn not end. period. tha price tag is as long as the finish. but hey - this is a VINTAGE 1905 wine..
  • chambolle commented:

    12/19/18, 1:30 PM - No, this is not a 'vintage wine.' The solera from which the wine is drawn was reputedly started in 1905; it has been refreshed repeatedly since then and the wine in the bottle likely has an average age of quite a bit less than 100 years. It's old and rare amontillado, make no mistake, but it is not 'vintage 1905' nor is the wine over 100 years old. Perez Barquero also has a line of older sherries labeled as "1955" and again the wines are not "vintage" 1955 - they are drawn from soleras commenced in 1955 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the bodega, which began - you guessed it, in 1905.

    Feel free to shoot me if I'm wrong. I'm reasonably confident I'm not.

Red
2005 Domaine Jean Tardy et Fils Nuits St. Georges 1er Cru Les Boudots Vieilles Vignes Pinot Noir
11/20/2017 - Bschar Does not like this wine:
80 points
A bit past its prime, perhaps. Thin in body and an unpleasant finish.
  • chambolle commented:

    11/19/18, 8:55 PM - No; this wine certainly is not ‘past its prime.’ Not even close, unless you opened a bad bottle - which might be flawed, but still not superannuated.

Red
2000 Poderi Luigi Einaudi Barolo Costa Grimaldi Nebbiolo
12/27/2016 - tcosgriff wrote:
85 points
Deep purple color. Very tannic and acid on first opening, but after some airing, the wine became beautifully balanced, but with only vague hints of black fruit, and maybe the slightest hint of tar. There were no rose petals to be found. Barolo is another wine that I have found over hyped and disappointing, despite mighty efforts. This was the best Barolo that I have had, but that isn't saying much. I ask myself whether I have lost my taste and smell, but I don't think that I have. I have friends that also have a hard time getting much out of these wines. Unfortunately, there aren't any new world examples that might teach us something, as the California Pinot Noirs have taught us about the inadequacies of red Burgundy.
I will stick with the Sangiovese wines, both pure and blended, and very good without some great mental effort.
  • chambolle commented:

    11/10/18, 2:31 PM - One of the strangest ‘tasting notes’ I’ve ever encountered. So much for Barolo and Burgundy, then? Centuries of viticulture tossed aside with a few keystrokes. Nothing mindbogglingly arrogant about that, is there...

Red
1993 Domaine Jean Tardy et Fils Nuits St. Georges 1er Cru Les Boudots Pinot Noir
10/16/2017 - pclin wrote:
92 points
Decent showing. Wine likes this is for acidity freak like me. Nervy and vigorous but not excessively acidic, probably not for everyone. Floral and clean on the nose. Not much tannins left, still showing a tad sweetness too. No hint of alcohol at finish with a touch of oaks lingering on. Plenty of dark soils too. If you want to taste a fully resolved Burgundy, this would be it. Enjoyable and interesting bottle.
  • chambolle commented:

    12/20/17, 6:35 PM - Your notes on this wine have inspired me to pull a bottle from a long neglected case and see whether it’s time to drink up. Sounds promising, actually.

Red
2005 Comte Armand Pommard 1er Cru Clos des Epeneaux Pinot Noir
4/23/2015 - onboisduvin wrote:
89 points
very dark and turbid. An earthy aroma not usually met in a burgundy bottle that is not a plus. Next time I will decant for a day...... Actually, this is not like a Burgundy wine at all.
  • chambolle commented:

    6/30/16, 2:02 PM - Turbid and earthy -- as in 'shaken, not stirred.' No surprise the wine did not show well.

Red
1999 Jacques-Frédéric Mugnier Chambolle-Musigny Pinot Noir
6/10/2014 - willthethrill wrote:
91 points
Perfectly ok $150 wine, but $700?!?!?!
  • chambolle commented:

    10/3/15, 2:59 PM - It's never been a $700 bottle, not even in the midst of the current cult of Chambolle-Musigny and all things Mugnier, and the insane runup in the price of Burgundy in general. Last auction hammer price is $150. $700 buys you Bonnes Mares and Les Amoureuses, or perhaps half a bottle of Mugnier Musigny -- not Chambolle-Musigny A.C.

Red
2007 Château de Puligny-Montrachet Nuits St. Georges 1er Cru Clos des Grandes Vignes Pinot Noir
1/1/2015 - Chuck C Likes this wine:
91 points
Very yummy, definitely French; but could be mistaken for a Oregon Pinot. Upon opening, has that distinctive French musty aroma. Great texture and smooth taste. A very nice wine.
  • chambolle commented:

    6/26/15, 2:12 PM - "Distinctive French musty aroma..."? So brettanomyces is "French"? That would appear to be what you're describing, but difficult to know what your idea of "French musty aroma" might be.

White
2007 Etienne Sauzet Chassagne-Montrachet Chardonnay
11/6/2013 - Bowmanifesto wrote:
89 points
Not sure if this is in a mute period, or a bottle somewhat less spectacular. Still excellent Montrachet. Just falling shot of the stellar qualities that have marked every previous bottle from this case. Still have three left. Let's wait a year before next.
  • chambolle commented:

    6/26/15, 12:23 PM - Montrachet? You seem to have posted quite a number of notes on this wine which refer to it as "Montrachet" and "grand vin." My friend, this is neither grand cru nor premier cru, and it definitely is not "Montrachet" -- it is Chassagne-Montrachet villages, at the bottom of the totem pole. It may share the "Montrachet" moniker, but it's a bit like calling a Mazda Miata a BMW M3. Nothing wrong with the Miata, mind you, it's a hoot to drive, just as this simple village wine is a hoot to drink, but they are distant relatives, if related at all.

    In fact, the Sauzet Chassagne villages comes from the lieu-dit Les Encegnieres, which is down the slope from Batard-Montrachet grand cru. It's a nice site, but there's a reason Batard is grand cru and Encegnieres is simple villages.

    So the question remains - what have you been drinking, Chassagne-Montrachet villages or Le Montrachet grand cru? I'm guessing the former, because the latter would be difficult to source in a full case lot given its small production, and would also run you about $5,000, not the $500 or so the Chassagne-Montrachet villages would ordinarily fetch by the case.

Red
2003 Domaine du Vieux Télégraphe Châteauneuf-du-Pape La Crau Red Rhone Blend
1/15/2015 - Jonny d wrote:
88 points
PnP then consumed over a couple of hours. Uninteresting. Nose was pretty flat and hot other than a little stewed plum and a bare hint of garrigue. Ruby in glass with very thin rim-- I would have guessed a much younger wine. Drying tanning, thin, and hot on the palate. Not impressed-- I've had better $10 Cote Roties. Will try the leftovers tonight to see if it has improved.
  • chambolle commented:

    6/21/15, 3:04 PM - $10 Cote Rotie? There ain't no such thing, and hasn't been for at least 30 years.

White
2007 Etienne Sauzet Chassagne-Montrachet Chardonnay
4/18/2015 - Anonymous Likes this wine:
91 points
Fading
  • chambolle commented:

    5/15/15, 11:01 AM - Perhaps the bottle you opened was "fading," although that seems inconsistent with a '91 point' evaluation. ... I'll grant the possibility of bottle variation, but the wine from my cellar thus far remains sound and none of the bottles I have opened in the past 18 months have been in danger of fading soon.

Red
2008 Domaine Marquis d'Angerville Volnay 1er Cru Les Fremiets Pinot Noir
1/16/2014 - drwine2001 wrote:
Angerville-Meursault Santenots and Volnay Fremiets (Arlequin Wine Merchant, San Francisco): Pale, translucent. Floral, briary nose with some funkiness as well. Lighter weight, tart red fruit, electric acidity that is well integrated. Structurally, this is much more akin to the '10 than the '09, but is a significant step down, without the balance or completeness of 2010. Still, for a leaner Cru in a high acidity vintage, not bad at all and may improve and soften over 3-5 years.
  • chambolle commented:

    11/17/14, 9:58 PM - Geezer that I am, I recall similar impressions of the '72 vintage, which eventually turned up some pretty wonderful older wines. Acidity is a friend of pinot noir and if the fruit is there, acidity seems to ensure longevity and freshness - and often pretty ethereal, intensely aromatic old bones. For that matter, if you tasted a lot of 2001s early on, they seemed pretty damned unyielding as well. Granted the results may be spotty, but when they're good, they're very very good, and still youthful.

  • chambolle commented:

    11/19/14, 1:14 PM - Herr Doktor Wein, you are certainly correct about the cost of burgundy nowadays - which has largely left me to drop out of the race completely where grand cru wines are concerned, particularly those the billionaires will now pay anything under the sun to own. Romanee Conti at $10,000 on release is simply out of my league, and I'm not ashamed to say it. So is Mugnier Musigny at $1000 or more a bottle. I can't get it out of my head that I bought the Musigny in not too distant memory for $50 or $75 a bottle, and the Romanee Conti for $600 a bottle, so it may be more a matter of not wanting to afford it. Whichever it is, where those are concerned, I'm a seller, not a buyer. The price has nothing to do with the liquid in the bottle, and everything to do with speculation, branding, cachet and the piece of paper glued on the front. If the whole Rudy/Kapon flap didn't prove that, I don't know what it takes to prove it to some people.

    I bet on '72s like La Tache, Vogue Bonnes Mares and such, and was glad 20 years later that they turned out as delicately lacy and beautiful as they did - and those wines did not start out with near the fruit the 2008s have. Those were big splurges back in the 70s at something like $15 to $25 a bottle if memory serves. Today it's hard to lay hands on La Tache for 50 times that, the Bonnes Mares 20 times that - and thus they probably are not the best bets in the world. But adjusted for inflation, wines at 1er cru level haven't gotten too awfully absurd, particularly in less than fashionable vintages; and at $50 or so a bottle for something like the 2008 d'Angerville Fremiets, I would take a risk, and have done so on half a dozen -- why not? My guess is that at 10 years from the vintage date, this may well be an attractive, fragrant bottle of wine, and possibly even lovelier at 15 to 20. Should I live so long.

White
2007 Domaine François Cotat Sancerre Les Monts Damnés Sauvignon Blanc
7/20/2014 - Kriz wrote:
flawed
- Yellow color - Another horrible bottle. Maybe this is just all gone. I don't like wine which smells like Gherkin juice and tastes like some sour, bitter mixture of piss and pickles and unions. I threw it away. disgusting.
  • chambolle commented:

    8/14/14, 3:47 PM - Very plainly a bad, unrepresentative bottle. The wine in good condition is far, far from "just all gone."

  • chambolle commented:

    8/14/14, 11:48 PM - Sorry to say, it appears you may have sourced poorly stored bottles or bottles abused in transit. Mine have been consistently good, as described in many of the other positive notes here.

Red
2010 Fattoria di Fèlsina Berardenga Chianti Classico Chianti Classico DOCG Sangiovese
2/14/2014 - admid wrote:
81 points
Ap: dark purple
Ar: plums, sour cherries, gras and a touch of barrelwood. Medium intensity.
Medium bodied with ok balance. Rough tannins that partly destroys the mouth feeling.
Medium length

Might improve with time, but I will not waste time, cellar space and money.

50+4+10+12+5=81
  • chambolle commented:

    3/6/14, 4:31 PM - Lemme ask, have you ever bothered to "waste cellar space, time and money" putting away some Felsina, Selvapiana, Castello di Ama, Fontodi or similar chianti classico for a decade or more to see what it can do? Ever drink a well cellared bottle of these wines with 10 to 20 years of bottle age on it? If your answer is no, then my friend, by being arrogantly dismissive and closed-minded, you're missing out.

    I have a rather large cellar (does 10,000 bottles or so qualify as "large"?) quite full of various tony, pricey bottles of Bordeaux, Burgundy (the mainstay of the cellar), Barolo, Cote Rotie and so on. But one of the greatest pleasures of keeping a cellar and holding an eclectic collection of wine for many years is finding simple, reasonably inexpensive yet substantial wines like this, which will improve for years and years and marry very well with appropriately matched cuisine. Osso buco with creamy risotto milanese, just to take a wild stab in the darkness.

    I still have chiantis from the usual suspects, including Felsina, from 1990 forward in reasonable quantities in my stash. I assure you the '90 Felsina is still very good, the '97 is just now morphing into a mature wine and has years ahead of it, and I probably will just be starting to drink the 2010 when 2020 rolls around - at which point it will still be in its early adolescence.

    If you haven't been there, don't try to write the travelogue.

  • chambolle commented:

    3/7/14, 8:25 AM - Admid, you're right on all counts, more or less. (1) Selvapiana is Chianti Rufina; (2) you plainly have a right to your opinion; and (3) I jumped to the unfounded and apparently erroneous conclusion that you, like many of the folks who seem to post 'tasting notes' on cellartracker, are talking out the top of your head. For that you have my sincere apology.

    It does get a bit old reading notes here on cellartracker that begin with a description of the cork, or with "this is the first time I've tasted a red burgundy...," or with a few relatively useless comments and then a 'score.' The internet is a wonderful thing, democracy and all that. But not everyone with a corkscrew and a glass ought to be publishing tasting notes for consumption by thousands of readers. Having a huge database of tasting impressions to tap into can be useful, but not if most of the database is noise.

    After I posted my comment I went and looked at your many notes and you obviously taste quite broadly. Your notes are all pretty quick and dirty, like this one was, and while they may be useful as an aide-memoire for you, not particularly helpful for someone who just stumbles upon them. But different strokes. I post notes here rarely, and when I do they are probably too verbose. What the heck.

    Where we disagree - and disagreements are part and parcel of a subjective endeavor like wine -- is your conclusion that it does not pay to hold the standard issue Chianti from producers like Felsina, Fontodi et al. And I often find I am more enamoured of the plain old Felsina classico bottling than the Rancia, the latter to my taste is not light enough on its feet, but that's my Burgundy-centric sensibility talking I suppose.

    Can we call a truce?

White
2007 Henri Prudhon & Fils Saint-Aubin 1er Cru En Remilly Chardonnay
2/21/2013 - rarewineman wrote:
93 points
The 1-17 note from "Chambolle" on this site is way off base...frankly wacky. This person must be in a legal battle with Prudhon...as this wine is simply riveting and out paces its appellation with rocket boosters. 93 is a low score for this gem.

If you can find it...buy all you can !!!
  • chambolle commented:

    2/21/13, 8:41 PM - Yet another thoughtful and descriptive tasting note from the Rarewineman. Tell me, what does "out paces its appellation with rocket boosters" look, smell and taste like? Solid rocket propellant?

    I would gladly sell you all I have, but I bought only a trio each of the '07 Chateniere and En Remilly out of curiosity, as I have not become familiar with Prudhon's wine previously. Perhaps the remaining bottles will show better than the ones I've tasted thus far, and I intend to keep an open mind and try them. I also put away a few 09s and 10s from Prudhon so we'll see whether I simply have fallen prey to bad samples, or whether I simply do not like the wines. I may even try to stop by and taste chez Prudhon when I am in Burgundy for a few weeks in March.

    In any event, I would truly appreciate it if you could meter back on the ad hominem nonsense and attempt to say something articulate and useful to people who may look to these notes for guidance. "Wow, 92 points" sure doesn't say much about the wine , does it? Nor does your condemnation of me as an "idiot."

White
2007 Henri Prudhon & Fils Saint-Aubin 1er Cru En Remilly Chardonnay
1/7/2013 - chambolle wrote:
"Wow" is surely not a very helpful note, particularly since from what I find in my glass right this moment, this is anything but a "wow" wine. Like the 2007 "Chateniere" from this producer, this is a wine that trades on oxidative characteristics. It is not a 'premox' wine, it is simply, in my view, lacking in fruit and showing instead a somewhat hollow blend of lemony acidity and winemaking signature, instead of a natural expression of fruit or terroir. Here, unlike the Chateniere 2007 from Prudhon, the wine has a fresh floral note at the front end, a good bit of acidity and a spicy/woody bite at the end, rather than the overwrought leesy, Californicated quality the Chateniere shows. That certainly is a plus by comparison, but there is also a distinct lack of fruit, of substance, of genuine earthiness or spice. What we have is a touch of honeysuckle treacliness allied with the acidic spine, backed up by a woody note - thankfully not vanillin, but not what I consider "wine" all the same. It seems like wine that someone tried to make in the cuverie rather than in the vineyard. I'm just guessing, but as hollow as this wine is, the yields must have been way up there chez Prudhon in 2007.

If that's a "wow," other than a "wow, I wish they wouldn't let people who control good vineyard sites make wine like this," then I must be missing something.
  • chambolle commented:

    2/21/13, 7:10 PM - Thanks very much for your thoughtful and edifying comment. It's almost as useful as your tasting note, which consisted of "wow." I'll tell you what I used to tell my daughter, when she was frustrated and acting out (and when she was three years old, not twelve as she is now) - "use your words." Surely you do know how to do that, correct?

    Now since you you'd like to make this about me, rather than about what I tasted in the glass, and, I believe, accurately reported in my tasting note, let me tell you a bit about my experience with wine in general, and Burgundy in particular. I've been buying and tasting wine since the 1970s, when I was in the wine business - before I lost my mind and became a lawyer instead. I presently have a cellar (at multiple locations) of about ten thousand bottles. Most of this assortment of bottles consists of Burgundy, admittedly most of it is red, not white, but I have more than enough Raveneau, Dauvissat, Droin, Michel, Roulot, Martray, Ramonet, Sauzet, etc. etc, etc. to keep me going for many years to come - probably more years than I have left to live. I'm not a trophy collector - I have wines from the most modest appellations to the top of the heap and everything in between. You might take a look at the tasting notes I've posted here - albeit I do so pretty rarely - to get an idea what I cellar and what I drink.

    I also spend a few weeks every year in Burgundy, where I taste hundreds and hundreds of wines in barrel and out of bottle. I've been doing this for going on two decades and have attended Les Grands Jours half a dozen times as well. My handle has been 'chambolle' since people started using the internet in droves in the early 90s. That ought to tell you something, dense though you may be.

    As my tasting note said, I've not been familiar with the Prudhon wines, and I'll admit I've not met the winemaker or tasted in his cellar, so perhaps you're right, I should not assume that my impression of the wine reflects his methods in the vineyard and the cellar. And it's perfectly possible that what I tasted in the bottles I purchased is not representative. Perhaps given that, I was a bit too harsh in my judgment, although I will tell you, I found the Prudhon wines I've tasted to date - granted, a small sample - quite unpleasant and, in my view, a bit dishonest, overwrought and mushy. I got no sense of terroir, no spine, and too much buttercream from the wines, without the life and freshness I expect from St. Aubin from good vintages and only in bottle for a few years. And I think I've tasted enough white burgundy, from modest bourgogne blanc to Le Montrachet, from scores of vintages and producers, from barrel, young and very mature. to have some idea what to expect. Believe me, I do not expect, or enjoy, California chardonnay.

    You could, of course, post an informative tasting note, rather than "wow," or you could provide some substantive information about the Prudhon wines, rather than call me an idiot. But of course, you didn't do that, did you?

    Until you're prepared to engage in an honest and thoughtful discussion about this or any other wine I may have tasted and for which I have posted a note, I'd suggest - in the spirit of your comment - that you just shut your yap. Go get drunk, or get in a brawl, or do something else consistent with the tone of your remarks.

1 - 21 of 21
© 2003-20 CellarTracker! LLC.

Report a Problem

Close