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Comments on my notes

(27 comments on 13 notes)

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Red
2014 Giacomo Conterno Barbera d'Alba Vigna Francia
5/23/2019 - AJ72 wrote:
70 points
So bad it's not funny. Horribly affected by Brettanomyces and a dead duck. Undrinkable and it was unanimous.

Edit: Looking at the other comments I'm in the minority (again). Oh well..
  • AJ72 commented:

    5/24/19, 4:45 AM - Hi Andreas
    I have thought about this before but at the present time Brett is not considered a fault. If I were to mark it as a fault then a lot of European wines would be faulty. I choose to mark the score down considering the severity of the Brett. This gives an indication to future purchasers of "caveat emptor" when seeing my review. At this stage I am in the minority given that other tasters don't share the same views but with time I believe this won't be the case. We tasted this wine in a tasting and everybody agreed, whether they noticed Brett or not that they didn't like it. I'm a winemaker by profession and believe brett will be the next thing the general consumer will become aware of in time. When this happens much work will be done to minimise the incidence in wine. This will be better for everyone.
    At the moment I see at least 50% of all European wines showing at least threshold levels of Brett. This isn't just in the lesser wines but also in the very best. I have seen so many wines having praise lavished on them on this forum because of the label they display. People have said that I don't know what I'm talking about. Without being arrogant I do know. My job gives me an insight that is at the frontline of production.
    As far as I'm concerned it's unacceptable that this is going unchecked so I use this forum to try and call it out. Yes it's the sound of one hand clapping at the moment but the wheel will turn.

  • AJ72 commented:

    5/24/19, 2:32 PM - It doesn't feel right to me that it should be lumped in the flawed category? That is giving the wine an excuse for being bad like cork taint or poor storage? This would be deceiving as it's actually a problem the producer can address if they choose to do something about it. Flawed is relating to an external event that transpires which is out of the winemakers control after the wine has been bottled in my opinion. At the time of bottling the Conterno Domaine has assessed this wine as being of an acceptable level of quality to release to the public under their label. Therefore the score I give is sending a message that they are choosing to release wine of sub standard quality (in my opinion of course).

    I conducted some extensive testing on a 2010 Cavallotto Barolo Bricco Boschis so have a look at my comments which support my analysis.

White - Off-dry
2005 Zind-Humbrecht Gewurztraminer Goldert Vendange Tardive Alsace Grand Cru Gewürztraminer
8/16/2009 - AJ72 wrote:
95 points
Fantastic wine. Excellent texture, soft with good acid drive. Doesn't seem sweet. If it is then its not noticeable. Gorgeous creme brulee and sour fruits lead into an explosion of exotic spices with a balance to die for.
  • AJ72 commented:

    9/10/18, 5:20 PM - Hope it's still as good now as it was then. Enjoy.

Red
2010 Cavallotto Barolo Bricco Boschis Nebbiolo
8/31/2017 - AJ72 wrote:
86 points
This is a polarising wine and I confess being a winemaker for my profession sees me marking this harshly. I really don't like brett but if you don't have a problem with it then this wine may still appeal to you. It's not completely stuffed and has a good deal of fruit underneath it but to me it's been affected too much. Having seen first hand the impact Brett has on wine it's hard to understand why many producers and consumers seem to be so oblivious to it? If you have the right equipment to deal with the issue in the winery you can reduce or avoid getting it altogether. I'm not advocating squeaky clean technically made wines either but Brett is NEVER doing anything good. I see many expensive wines on these pages with Brett issues getting praise heaped upon them (Thierry Allemand etc) and wonder how long it will take the general consumer to start to notice? I can understand as it's not something that easily recognised it's only through years of analysing wine that you begin to see it and then the damage that it does to your own wines. I was once dismissive about colleagues who were "Brettcentric" but there's no turning back after you've seen the light. Maybe ignorance is bliss.

Edit 11/13/2017: To back up my comments I will provide the laboratory analysis (costs around $80 per test) for 4EP:4EG levels present in this wine. These are the compounds which are responsible for the alteration of a wine's DNA when Brett affected. If the laboratory analysis indicates no presence of Brett I shall eat my words.

Edit 12/04/2017: Okay the results are in for this wine. The wine has been tested for presence of 4EP:4EG in the sample and tested by a NADA accredited laboratory which we use all the time to test our own wines. The sample was taken from a fresh bottle so bottle variation is not a factor in this.

4 Ethyl Phenol= 760ppm
4 Ethyl Guaiacol= 110ppm

This is a very high level given that threshold of detection is around 50ppm. The ratio between the two is about 7:1 (4EG:4EP). This is indisputably a bretty wine which backs up my original judgement and comments. To me the wine is impacted but if you like it then take these results with a grain of salt and keep enjoying wine irrespective of whether it's bretty or not. However you can't deny the presence of brett.

Cheers

Adam
  • AJ72 commented:

    9/3/17, 6:00 AM - Yes i agree flawed would be a more adequate assessment. I will remove the score altogether though and just let the comments be the guide.

    Dream. I hear what you're saying. As I said this is how I see the wine and maybe it was an off bottle but normally wouldn't be the case. I am being a bit harsh as I said and fully understand your support of the producer.

    Warning! Please do not read on if you wish never to burdened with Brett detection when consuming wine! Ignorance is bliss.

    Admid. A product of Brettanomyces metabolism is 4-EthylPhenol and 4-EthylGuaiacol. They contribute grubby barnyard band aid characters to the aroma, diminish fruit freshness, mask expression and alter texture and mouthfeel. Severity depends on levels present and in what ratio. Brett is like a parasite that feeds on the wines DNA and alters it irreversibly.

    It is identifiable by specific analysis in a laboratory. These specific compounds and the ratio they are present in will determine whether it's likely to be detectable. It is correct as you say that the threshold of detection will be different for everyone. At low levels of <50ppm it's usually not an issue and possibly undetectable. Above this threshold (sometimes below depending on ratio) if you notice it that's never a good thing. This doesn't mean the wine is not still enjoyable but does mean the wine is no longer a 100% representation of what it should be. Whether that be a minor 0.5% reduction or more it's a negative impact.

    Brett spoilage results in the same changes of a wines makeup no matter where they're from in the world so I wouldn't consider it to be a component of terroir. I will report back the results of the lab test and eat my words if there is no presence of 4EP:4EG.

  • AJ72 commented:

    9/3/17, 3:48 PM - Unfortunately the sample I had left at work has been discarded so not able to test the wine.

  • AJ72 commented:

    11/8/17, 2:47 PM - Guitar Guy. I wouldn't expect a reduced price due to brett issues but probably more due to stock needing to be moved on. I don't think the winery would think they have an issue along with many, many old and new world producers around the world.

  • AJ72 commented:

    11/9/17, 1:53 PM - Unfortunately no matter how devoted to hygiene or fastidious you are in the cellar no one is immune to the chance of getting brett spoilage in their wine. I thought I was doing all the right things until one year we inexplicably had an outbreak in our barrels. After trying various things it took me three years to find the solution. Many sleepless nights let me tell you. The solution was to purchase a barrel steamer which has eliminated the problem. I'm not doing anything differently than I was before only now there isn't a brett issue.

  • AJ72 commented:

    11/10/17, 2:34 AM - Agreed. I have actually purchased another bottle of this wine. I will taste it and send it off for analysis 4EP:4EG. Post results when I have them.

  • AJ72 commented:

    12/3/17, 5:35 PM - Okay the results are in for this wine. The wine has been tested for presence of 4EP:4EG in the sample and tested by a NADA accredited laboratory which we use all the time to test our own wines.

    4 Ethyl Phenol= 760ppm
    4 Ethyl Guaiacol= 110ppm

    This is a very high level given that threshold of detection is around 50ppm. The ratio between the two is about 7:1 (4EG:4EP). This is indisputably a bretty wine which backs up my original judgement and comments. To me the wine is flawed but if you like it then take these results with a grain of salt and keep enjoying wine irrespective of whether it's bretty or not. However you can't deny the presence of brett.

    Cheers

    Adam

  • AJ72 commented:

    12/4/17, 2:25 PM - Admid. I would prefer not to disclose my place of work.

  • AJ72 commented:

    8/29/18, 6:34 PM - Brett is an incredibly divisive subject. I wish I never knew what it was to be honest. Once you see it, it's hard to look past it. There is no doubt it has a negative impact on the composition of a wine. Having worked in a winery with a history of it there is no sure fire solution either to prevent it from happening. Brett is a resilient b(y)east.

Red
1987 Domaine Armand Rousseau Père et Fils Gevrey-Chambertin 1er Cru Clos St. Jacques Pinot Noir
9/13/2016 - AJ72 wrote:
98 points
France Soir beauty (South Yarra): I think this is the highest score I've ever given to a premier cru burgundy and today it was the equal of one of the two younger Chambertin's from the same stable it was that good. I would expect given a bit more time the others will score higher but today in this condition this CSJ was nothing short of extraordinary. Surely there isn't another bottle around today which is in this good a condition. When the wine was first poured out in to the glasses even knowing that we had a thirty year old wine in the bracket it was hard to tell which wine of the four was the one with the age, even when you looked closely! Only with a few minutes of air did things become a little more apparent. Out of all the great wines we had today this was probably the most impressive because it looked so young and drank like a beautifully aged wine should. Very reductive initially oozing class out of every pore. Lovely fine bones on the palate and length that goes on forever. I would say this is one of the most perfect thirty year old wines I've ever had and if your bottle is as good as this one you're in for a real treat. Rousseau is the King of Burgundy in my book.
  • AJ72 commented:

    1/2/18, 5:27 PM - Great to here about the 87 Rousseau! I've loved Rousseau's wines for a long time and always thought they were affordable (comparatively) when DRC was four or five times the price. Rousseau's Chambertin is different but at least the equal of La Tache in my opinion so the value has always been with Rousseau even though they are now getting quite expensive. When I began buying Rousseau's wines the Chambertin was around $180 Australian back in 1999. Anyway great to here you came across an equally stellar bottle of the CSJ! Cheers Adam

Red
2013 Domaine Jamet Côte-Rôtie Syrah
7/8/2016 - AJ72 wrote:
82 points
Nice wines; 7/8/2016-7/9/2016 (Geelong VIC): One of the riper Jamet's and not better for it. Has some nice elements on the nose, sauvage, spicy and a lifted perfume. The palate is very high toned, sweet fruited and acidic. Unfortunately the balance has been compromised here by either growing conditions or liberal use of acid in the winery. There is a kind of overripe/underripe unpleasant sour like character which makes the wine lean very showy and not much fun to drink. Given the premium commanded here it was again (like the Allemand) a disappointment.
  • AJ72 commented:

    9/26/16, 5:45 PM - Maybe but it didn't look like the bottle was compromised. I have seen Jamet's look similar from other years (06 comes to mind) where they've not quite got it right. When they're good they're exceptional and I just didn't feel this bottle was one of those. I will have to revisit some stage down the track and it was from a half bottle so I do take your point. Can only call it as I see it.

  • AJ72 commented:

    9/27/16, 1:36 AM - Most wines are imported in reefers to Australia. I have had many many bottles of wine from Europe here, old and young and of course there would have been a few casualties coming across the equator. If any importer wants to remain in business they would all have to do this otherwise they wouldn't be in business long. Having tasted in Europe as well as here the wines of most producers I've written about I have a pretty good idea how the wines should look. It may be the half bottle wasn't the best representation of the wine but, and I can't prove this, it could be a variety of factors. Usually you can tell if it's cork related and I don't suspect that was the case here. Being so young it could have been a storage issue who knows as I didn't buy it but having another bottle will be the only way I can confirm my opinion. I don't believe that all the bottles that came here would have been heat affected especially from the importer who brings in Jamet. I still stand by my initial assessment for now as like I said I have seen Jamet wines in some years miss the mark. The majority of wine I have tasted here has been sound and if any issue arises it's usually a result of where people store the wine once they take it home.

  • AJ72 commented:

    9/29/16, 5:35 AM - I've had a few of the Gentaz wines and I enjoyed them. I had high expectations for them and I felt they were lauded as being legendary wines but on what I saw they didn't quite live up to the hype. Good wines though and admittedly I've only had the 90 and 91.
    I make wine for a living and try to be as impartial as I can when assessing, compiling notes. I like to give credit where it's due and am quite a generous marker when I like something but am equally the opposite when I don't. Thierry Allemand has made some great wines but I won't buy anything else from him until I see he has addressed an issue with Brettanomyces which has affected the more recent wines I've tasted. Most other tasters either don't have a problem with it or don't see it as they score quite highly. I have scored them very low as I can see the wines have been affected quite badly but others are fine with it. Who's right? Each person can make their own case to argue for and against but in the end it's subjective there is no right or wrong.
    So it is with my scores for the Jamet's reflecting when I don't like them as much.

  • AJ72 commented:

    9/29/16, 6:25 AM - Yes agree the Gentaz wines are now going the way of Henri Jayer, which were great wines but now museum pieces only such is the prohibitive cost of obtaining anything. The last Gentaz I bought was in 2009 for about $100 which I thought was pretty good considering the reputation at the time. They've gone up a lot since then and not seen one since in Australia. DRC are also ridiculously priced too but have, along with Leroy always been that way but now it really is a rich mans game to try Romanee Conti and would put La Tache in the same category. Rousseau is going that way too but they were always underpriced in comparison to DRC and the quality of the Domaine is just as good in my opinion.
    Just bought another 2013 Jamet which I will put into a benchmark tasting at work. Will be trying in a couple of months time and will post my thoughts.

Red
1993 Domaine Dujac Clos St. Denis Clos St. Denis Grand Cru Pinot Noir
8/26/2016 - AJ72 wrote:
91 points
Showing a good level of maturity. I must confess I've never understood the hype behind Dujac. Sure they're well made and interesting but I don't find myself waxing lyrical about the style which is heavily accented by the stems. In my view stems are like oak, to be used sparingly as a supporting component. If you can see the stems and they're a dominant feature then there's too much. I virtually never buy the Dujac wines purely because I think their house style is dominated by stemmy characters which mask the expression of the fruit. This wine confirms this for me. Don't get me wrong it is a lovely wine, very lithe and supple, certainly Grand Cru Pedigree but after twenty years the stems are still too dominant for my liking and detract from the wine a bit. I'm being a bit picky here but a slightly green element from the stems and the rusticity that has come with maturity is accentuated by the stems for me. I like the wine though as it does show its class and typical of the vintage there is some structure there but it's melted away now showing a finer profile. I always thought the 93's were built to last. Very good maybe better bottles than this one out there.
  • AJ72 commented:

    8/26/16, 6:26 PM - You and I have the same taste as I believe Rousseau to be the King of Burgundy also. Henri Jayer also made phenomenal wines in the same vein but now like collecting art such are the prices. DRC as well as being way too much to buy I often see the stems too although I have had some spectacular La Tache. I would still buy Rousseau Chambertin over it though. I am definitely prejudiced when it comes to Dujac but lots of people love them. Unfortunately the prices of Rousseau have gone up a lot too. I always thought they were too cheap in comparison to DRC. I don't get to have as many Rousseau's these days but we've secured an 08 Chambertin and a 2010 Clos St Jacques for a lunch in a couple of weeks time. There will also be an 06 Duvault Blochet DRC and I'm tipping it won't be up to the class of the other two. We shall see.

White
2006 Domaine Leflaive Chevalier-Montrachet Chevalier-Montrachet Grand Cru Chardonnay
7/17/2016 - sjwshiraz wrote:
Summer 2016. A travesty of a Chevalier. Too fat and lacking definition. Also, the colour is worryingly dark. What is wrong with Leflaive nowadays ?
  • AJ72 commented:

    8/9/16, 4:59 PM - I completely agree with you but fear not it was only a temporary dropping of the ball for Leflaive. I have had many wines from the 2006 and 2007 vintages and they're all stuffed. Apparently they had an issue in change over of staff during this period and the results were disastrous. A few wines since then have been back on form although it will be interesting to see how they go now that Anne Claude Leflaive is no longer around. Cheers

  • AJ72 commented:

    8/13/16, 9:16 AM - Hey Noppakit! Yes I have used this method myself with good success too I will often look at two bottles side by side and put back into auction any that don't pass the test. It's a minefield out there. I have had some really good white burgundy's from 06 and 07 but the only Domaine Leflaive wine I've enjoyed from these vintages was the Bourgogne Blanc.

Red
2014 Clos Cibonne Tibouren Côtes de Provence Cuvée Spéciale
7/10/2016 - AJ72 wrote:
79 points
Nice wines; 7/8/2016-7/9/2016 (Geelong VIC): The only good thing about this wine is a peekaboo from behind a curtain of Brett which gives an indication of what this wine might have been. I think it would have been pretty enjoyable but for the lick of Brett and a seemingly unresolved primary ferment which has left too much sugar on the table. Between cork, premox and Brett issues I'm finding European wine a minefield to navigate. At least this one was inexpensive
  • AJ72 commented:

    7/13/16, 12:44 AM - I am a bit sensitive to Brett I must disclose this. I am a winemaker and generally we are a bit more analytical than most. This does have its drawbacks as much wine I dislike most people wouldn't notice. That being said, like a stockbroker who gets a read on the market long before the shareholders do we can be ahead of the curve as far as general taste is concerned. I believe it will be the case with Brettanomyces spoilage as once attuned to the character it is very obvious what is present is not good. This may be a while away yet as the general consumer is blissfully unaware but eventually the penny must drop. I have first hand seen the damage this yeast does to what would otherwise have been fantastic wine. It is not desirable at any level and if at threshold detection levels then the wine is no longer as good as it should be on the nose and palate. The most frustrating thing is that nobody has a clear answer how to combat the problem yet. So far a designated barrel steamer has been the only solution but there are still no guarantees.

Red
2010 Thierry Allemand Cornas Chaillot Syrah
7/8/2016 - AJ72 wrote:
84 points
Nice wines; 7/8/2016-7/9/2016 (Geelong VIC): It doesn't give me any pleasure writing this review as it flies in the face of previous comments. This wasn't an off bottle either. This wine is just an example of the damage which can be done when a wine is affected by brettanomyces spoilage. It's not that obvious at first, on the nose anyway, but the pallet is a good indicator. I've had some excellent bottles over the years from Allemand but I think lately they've got an issue.
The nose has classic Cornas character musk, olive, pepper and spice but it is dark and slightly grubby. Muted somewhat. Initially I thought it was going to be good. The pallet is tough as old boots not in the classic way a Cornas should be either the tannins are dry, raspy and chunky with zero texture. The acid is really piercing too as the pallet is very lean and unyielding. The wine lacks generosity and is mean and tight. The tannins get more aggressive the longer the wine sits in the glass until they were so bitter none of us could persist with the wine and we tipped 3/4 of a $200 bottle down the sink and moved on to something else. Major disappointment. This is not because the wine isn't ready yet or too young. There are no excuses for wine like this, it's a result of Brett spoilage which has hollowed out the palate and left just a shell of what the wine would have been. Once you recognise this the label doesn't cloud your judgement as I was a believer for a long time of Allemand. If you want the real deal avoid this overpriced disappointment and buy Clape which doesn't suffer from any of the aforementioned problems.
  • AJ72 commented:

    7/9/16, 5:40 AM - Yes I think this (Brett) is a consistent theme for this producer unfortunately. Many great French wines are having too much now. Once you know what it is it's hard to look past but in my winemaking I've had it and learnt how to reduce it so it's insignificant. You can never guarantee zero level of Brett but it's what you aim for. The problem is a lot of French winemakers either don't perceive it or don't know how to get rid of it for future vintages. I think this will become a very big bugbear especially for the expensive wines as people become attuned to what it is. I have had wines with perfect figures in our cellar (pH 3.4, Free SO2 above 40ppm or 0.8 molecular) go bretty prior to malolactic fermentation being complete with only 4weeks in barrel! So it's not always sulphur that can keep Brett away either as it's very pervasive. The only thing that has given good results is steaming our barrels with a steaming unit once a year prior to the harvest. I think the French and others need to wake up to what's happening as I've tipped many expensive bretty wines down the sink lately.

Red
2013 Mount Mary Quintet Yarra Valley Red Bordeaux Blend
7/9/2016 - AJ72 wrote:
84 points
Nice wines; 7/8/2016-7/9/2016 (Geelong VIC): I normally love these wines but not this one. Very pithy and lacking elegance. Atypical for this producer, a bit astringent and seems quite acidic which further narrows an already lean palate. Not unexpected as it wasn't a great year for the Yarra. See the 2010, 06 or the 04 if you want the real thing.
  • AJ72 commented:

    7/9/16, 5:15 AM - Yes normally I do enjoy the wines but 13 is no joy. I am Australian and make wine in the yarra region. Sam Middleton is a friend of mine and we swapped some wine with him so don't enjoy writing a review like that but got to be honest.

Red
2008 Giacomo Conterno Barolo Cascina Francia Nebbiolo
6/12/2015 - AJ72 wrote:
91 points
A nice wine to be sure but didn't fall in love with it. A nice level of tarry sweet fruits with a raw grape character that slightly detracted from things a bit. As I get older I'm noticing that a bit with Nebbiolo in particular and it's making me less enamored with it. It did follow an awesome bottle of Chave so maybe I'm being a bit unfair? This was a nice but simpler wine and not because it was too young either. This is my favourite producer so expected more but maybe older age is causing a declining interest in the style as it was more of a wrestle than a priviledge.
  • AJ72 commented:

    7/5/15, 5:10 AM - I think it was more to do with me than anything else. Maybe with more time it will come into its own a bit more but not sure. I'm not drinking much anymore so my radar may be a little off because I usually love G.Conterno wines. The Chave we had before it could also have played a part as it was so good. A hard act to follow.

White
2010 Coche-Dury Meursault Chardonnay
8/10/2013 - AJ72 wrote:
flawed
Great Dinner Wines (Healesville Victoria): First casualty of the night. Not completely gone but definitely a casualty of the cork. Lean too lean. Damn!
  • AJ72 commented:

    10/13/13, 11:17 PM - Hi Greg

    Yes I agree I have seen the plastic bag work to some effect but.... I am a winemaker myself and this particular evening there were so many wines that it wouldn't have been practical unfortunately. An embarrassment of riches you could say. In this particular case I believe the cork had only just started to cause the spoilage given that the wine was so young. There was no detectable TCA but the wine was muted and changed to the point where any redeeming features of this very young wine had been lost. It was kind of like 80% of the content had been stripped out and what was left was very underwhelming. Disappointing for such a prized bottle for sure and I haven't had the best strike rate with Coche Dury wines over the years. I had a 2002 Coche Perrieres a few years back which was a similar experience to this bottle. I worked with Thierry Matrot (Meursault) back in 2012 (poor vintage by the way, tiny harvest so probably won't be cheap either) and I asked him the very question about why the wines were becoming premoxed. He was very puzzled by this but believes as you suggested lower doses of SO2 could be partly to blame but only forms part of the story. He couldn't articulate any one thing in particular but knows there is a problem. He makes incredible wines, different to Coche but can be equally as good more backward in style at only a fraction of the price. He has had an issue with cork spoilage which may have been doing his reputation some harm (more TCA than premox). I would say each time he opened a bottle 25% were either TCA or stripped. Sometimes I couldn't tell but because he knew the wine so well he would say "no I don't think this is right" and sure enough the next bottle was liquid gold. Unfortunately Ive had to hang up my drinking boots so I don't visit the site very often. Apologies for the late reply.

    Adam

  • AJ72 commented:

    12/4/13, 1:07 AM - Brett is also a concern and keeps me awake at night due to its randomness. If there is Brett active in the wine it usually chews up the free sulphur as an added effect much like yeast does during normal fermentation. Domaine Leflaive's wines are brilliant but something was amiss for the 06 and 07 vintages. All the premier cru's Ive tasted are oxidised and very advanced, undrinkable is the 06 Clavoillon so not sure what happened there. I heard Pierre Morey had left during this time. The exception is the Bourgogne Blanc which is as you would expect good value. I haven't had many good 06's even Matrot seemed light on for acid and most seem a bit broad. I did taste a very good Bourgogne Blanc from Bernard Moreau though tonight 2006. Seems like the Bourgogne level wines are the value. Similar to 03 reds where anything above village level is generally not reflecting the nuance of the site owing to the hot weather. A generalisation I admit as you'll always find a diamond in the rough to counter the claim and make you look silly. Another thing on Brett. Although rare I had a bottle of the normally pretty good Michel Niellon 2005 Les Chenevottes. It was horribly bretty and not often you see that in a white to the point where I can't imagine what it must have been like as a young wine. Will be posting my thoughts on this.

    Cheers

    Adam

Red
2009 Domaine G. Roumier / Christophe Roumier Morey St. Denis 1er Cru Clos de La Bussière Pinot Noir
6/12/2013 - AJ72 wrote:
If you have some dont open for a little while. Very primary but all the components are there. Perfume of violets, looks like any young wine from anywhere at this stage (high quality Pinot that is). With time however Burgundy seems to have the ability to be able to completely suppress what makes them truly unique and I suspect this wine will shine quite brightly if given five years plus. Only young but I'll go out on a limb and say this is the best Roumier Clos de la Bussiere I've had (94-95 points?). Time will tell.
  • AJ72 commented:

    8/27/13, 5:01 PM - I do love the wines of George Roumier when they are good. Some are brilliant but some are lean and rustic in style. Hard to explain why this is? Consistency can be a bit of an issue and I think pricing is on the high side. I haven't had 1990 but some of the vintages from that decade have been good for this wine/producer (95,99). That being said a 91 of this wine was underwhelming. Not in the same league as Rousseau which is a style I can't get enough of.

  • AJ72 commented:

    8/30/13, 5:39 AM - Agree with Dujac comments. I cant remember if Ive even posted one on the forum. I rarely drink Dujac, too stemmy.

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