Red

2005 Jean Bourdy Côtes du Jura Rouge

Red Blend

  • France
  • Jura
  • Côtes du Jura
Drink between 2014 - 2047 (Edit)
CT89.8 90 reviews
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Community Tasting Notes 81

  • marycamp wrote: 91 points

    May 7, 2019 - I have been sitting on these for 9+ years, and found one tonight while seeking something else and this was about as pleasant a Tuesday night surprise as I could have hoped for (especially for the $19.99 I paid). Tangy, earthy, yet somehow elegant (in spite of the cloudy style). Looking forward to following it this week and glad I have two more for down the road. A Garagiste win!

    1 person found this helpful Comment
  • Michael Davis Likes this wine: 96 points

    January 13, 2019 - An impeccable food wine. The first of my six bottles and I can’t wait to dig into more. Drinks like great burgundy with a hint of rusticity. Delicate, and complex on the palate. Like drinking great perfume.

    3 people found this helpful Comment
  • Connecticut Wino Likes this wine: 90 points

    February 23, 2018 - A bit of an adventure. Day One: funky and backward upon opening, but tannin structure and acid tang were promising. Over about four hours, the funk blew (mostly) off. Day Two: seemed much brighter and younger, if that can be believed. Dark fruits well integrated into a melange of secondary flavors including leather, tobacco, eucalyptus, and the slightest hint of the barnyard. Overall, an intriguing wine that still has years of life in it.

    3 people found this helpful Comment
  • Rene58 wrote:

    July 20, 2017 - Opened one bottle, fruit and structure lacking. -

  • KeithAkers wrote: 91 points

    November 20, 2016 - A lazy sunday afternoon (Eric&Megan's): Nose: The nose is aromatic and balanced with earth tones, leather, rasbperries, dark red cherries, and potpourri. There is good depth to this as well while bringing an earthier side.

    Taste: Medium bodied with high acidity and medium+ tannins. The structure is supportive right now, but it is a bit sneaky as the tannins have a chewiness to them and the acidity is sharp. The feel is lithe with earth tones, leather, raspberries, and dark red cherries.

    Overall: This is an outstanding Cotes du Jura Rouge. It shows off the rusticity of the region while also having a lot of the perfume. This could certainly last a while longer, but it is really pretty right now.

    1 person found this helpful Comment
1 - 5 of 81 More notes

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Garagiste

  • By Jon Rimmerman
    4/20/2010 (link)

    (BOURDY Cotes du Jura ROUGE) UPDATE: 2009 Bordeaux, House Bill 5034 and Consumer Rights Consumer advocacy groups vie for our attention on a daily basis - there are so many worthy causes to support in life that it's difficult to give credence to all of them. Here's a subject that, while unimportant in the scheme of world peace and famine, may/will affect your wine rights (not to mention your potential ability to receive the 2009 Bordeaux futures I will discuss below). For a broad swath of opinions, editorials and general blog (mis)information about this subject, please see the links below. Keep in mind, law is only pen on ink until someone enforces it or interprets it in a way that may or may not have been the impetus for the original legislation to begin with: http://www.winespectator.com/webfeature/show?id=42526 http://www.facebook.com/pages/STOPHR5034/114589208561336?v=wall http://bit.ly/alVXdr http://www.nbwa.org/news/press-release While still unclear, if this law passes, there's a serious risk that wine shipping across state lines will become illegal in more states than not. While few of us stop to consider something this trivial in the realm of other far more important daily activities, that's exactly what the wholesalers or those behind this bill hope for - apathy. While it appears far-fetched in 2010 that you would not be able to send wine across state lines (considering you can walk into any regular post office in France and they will help wrap your wine and send it anywhere in the country without a blink, social security number, signed confessional, proof of age statement or other), if you want to insure that your rights remain intact, it's time to write your congressman or, better yet, Obama - he's a wine fan just like the rest of us and he's also a fan of the Commerce Clause. So, as an impetus for discussion, does the Commerce Clause trump state's rights, vice versa or neither? Is this new potential legislation even a matter of the Commerce Clause? You may want to consider all of this when you're about to plunk down your hard-earned funds for a case of 2009 Latour. 2-3 years is a long time to wait for wine to be delivered - a lot can happen in that time and the world may not be the same place it was when you originally placed your order. It sure would be a long drive from NY to California to pick up your futures... While all do the above may be a lot of smoke and mirrors, it opens discussion on the basic nature of consumer rights versus those of the government and/or of large corporations. In a case like this, there is no right or wrong, but the topic acts as a leverage for discussion...which is still as American as apple pie. 2009 Bordeaux... As far as 2009 Bordeaux futures are concerned, I've been asked by a legion of you out there where to find the best prices/most reliable sources of delivery (as most of you know we only dabble slightly in Bordeaux futures and our prices tend to be very high). Usually, I direct you to several sources but this year the lowest prices and best track record for delivery appear to be on the west coast (which is odd, as the travel from Bordeaux is more expensive). As far as I can tell, two sources have the lowest prices, Wine Exchange in southern California and JJ Buckley in the Bay Area (although I'm sure Premier Cru will be in the same ballpark as well). I still recommend K & L, Wine Club in SF, Woodland Hills, Zachy's and several others for their superlative track record of delivery (which Wine Exchange has as well) but those sources that have chosen to act as their own agent have quietly revolutionized the en-premier game. In the past, most US retailers had to look for a middleman source in the US (like Kobrand, etc) - not anymore. In today's world, many retailers act as their own importers and you are the beneficiary with en-premier retail prices that are (most likely) even cheaper than in the UK or in France. I'm sure there are a bunch of other retailers that will be close to the model of pricing mentioned above but I can't imagine anyone being lower with a long track record of delivery (maybe Basins in DC or Calvert Woodley?). If nothing else, this new model will force others to follow suit and lower their prices (or get out of the game entirely). I wouldn't be surprised to see retail margins on 2009 Bordeaux futures in the US cut to 6-8%. So, no matter how high the Bordelaise price their 2009s, by cutting out a good portion of the "gras" (as they say in France) the US consumer is going to see the absolute lowest prices on Bordeaux futures possible. That deserves our applause. - Jon Rimmerman ***************************** Bourdy Dear Friends, Another gift from Jean-Francois Bourdy - a final allocation of the 2005 Cotes du Jura Rouge...at the original release price. I realize this oneiric wine may be polarizing for some but its ultra-natural/animal expression of Pinot Noir and site place is unique in the wine-world and, for me, unmatched under $20. For those of you on the quest for terroir, you've found your calling card in this wine and it also has the capacity and track record for ageing up to a century (no, I'm not kidding). Talk about looking after his best customers? If loyalty means anything in today's world, Jean-Francois Bourdy stands by those that have supported him. It's easy for people to piggy-back on a hot commodity (exactly what this wine has become in the wine-geek world - thanks to blogs and forum boards) but what about all of you that purchased the wine on blind faith? Eccentric, atypical, exotic, stone-faced and off-putting (in a good way), Bourdy's 2005 Cotes du Jura Rouge is probably the most blogged about wine we offered last year. With notoriety comes expansive and extended interest from around the world and we've been sold out of this wine since last year with no real hope of an additional allocation... ...enter Jean-Francois to the rescue this morning with the last of his 2005 - at the same tariff as last year (which is completely against the Jura business model which has automatic price increases across the board every January 1st). With that, here goes... (for the original long-winded expose' on this wine, please see the offer from last year below) 2005 Bourdy Cotes du Jura Rouge Thank you, Jon Rimmerman Garagiste Seattle, WA SOFR6298 ***************************** (original offer from last year): 2005 Dear Friends, Most of you know I am prone to what can be perceived as overzealous hyperbole (although not intentional) - even with that stigma there are certain wines I have to consciously pull back on the pen for fear of sounding too over the top - even though the wine may justify the excitement. This is one of those wines where I will try to be calm but (overzealous or not) the wine deserves as much praise as any vinous achievement in the world. I started hearing about this wine while it was still in barrel, long before our Bourdy/Blue Hill event took place - it is finally finished, safely in bottle where it will remain (in the luckiest of cellars) for the next 5-6 decades. The scary part? It is actually beautiful to drink on release as well, which is not the typical hallmark of this wine (it is usually downright unruly for the first 6-10 years after release). The 2005 ushers in a new era at Bourdy and he swung for the farthest fence he could see. If the La Grapperie "Adonis" was the most unique wine I tasted in France during my spring stay, what does that make this? It was the only wine I literally fell over in my chair after tasting - I wrote one word on my tasting sheet - "lifechanging". Well, lifechanging is not an actual word, I believe I meant "life changing" but you get the point. My first encounter with this wine was at a blind tasting in Paris where I had no idea what it was (I'm not afraid to admit when I'm stumped). My initial guess was 2005 Bonnes Mares but it was far too mineral drenched and perfumed for Bonnes Mares. There was something about the structure of the wine that kept bringing me back to upper Chambolle or possible Gevrey around Clos St. Jacques. I usually always go with my first gut instinct (in a blind tasting, as well as life) but there was something nagging at me - I knew the wine wasn't 100% Pinot Noir but it was too complete and beautifully textured to be a Jura wine...or was it? After an hour, my host had enough fun and removed the brown bag from the bottle. While those in attendance sat scratching their head in bewilderment - I honestly wasn't surprised. The wine already had so much hype on pre-release in the French sommelier circuit that is was bound to be a head-tuner. The wine was the 2005 Bourdy Cotes du Jura Rouge - the first wine made by the new methodology at Bourdy (strict biodynamic farming and natural winemaking according to a lunar schedule of gravity waning and waxing on the earth). The result is a loudspeaker for natural viticulture - a wine with Grand Cru aspirations and one of Europe's most storied histories behind it, unafraid to take the chance that natural winemaking has at its core. Leroy was a motivation here, if Lalou can do it with her Chambertin then why not Bourdy with his top red wine?. In the past, Bourdy adhered to natural methods but the 2005 was the first wine grown and vinified with the most intense organic principles possible and it shows in the acute freshness and incredible detail of the wine. The fact that this is the modern day reincarnation of the 1955 Rouge doesn't hurt either. Those of you that tasted (and smelled) the 1955 Cotes du Jura Rouge at Blue Hill last December will recall one of the more celestial wine experiences anyone will encounter. It was an unusual vintage, heavy in Poulsard (instead of dominated by Pinot Noir) and the 2005 follows the same blueprint with almost 30-40% Poulsard (plus 30% Pinot Noir and 20-30% Trousseau). Jean-Francois Bourdy claims (with a deadpan face) that the 2005 is the best red wine not only since the 1955 but since the 1911. I guess my opinion holds little weight in comparison to that statement. How do you describe this wine? It borders on transcendental for a wine this good for this price (unless you are in the Loire or Beaujolais). In truth, typical wine words do not do this rendition of the storied Cotes du Jura Rouge justice - Brilliant? Certainly. Profound? Absolutely. It is so deep in complex layers of medium-weight, filigreed soil, stone, fruit, spice and elegant extract that you almost forget you are drinking wine. Think 2005 Chambolle-Musigny (the above mentioned Bonnes Mares comes to mind) meets a feminine 2005 Descombes Cote du Brouilly VV - add the magic of the mountains, a dash of eccentricity (although toned way down in 2005), 50-100 year old vines... and 50-80 years of ageing potential and you will see why I am this enthused. Acid ball? No way, not in 2005 - this is the real deal cut from some of the the purest cool-toned fruit and terroir in Europe. If you are expecting sweet, ripe, round fruit, look elsewhere - if you crave the finest delicate old-world concoctions that challenge you on multiple levels (although still beautifully ripe, akin to 2005 Burgundy), this is your wine. With a history as long as the Grand Cru's of the Cote d'Or (with even longer ageing potential), one would think Bourdy could charge a bit more for this wine ($29.99? $39.99? $49.99) - whatever the motivation, the new release price hasn't changed in years. Instead of offering futures, they offer a bottom of the barrel price on the first release and the tariff quickly escalates from there (in a similar fashion to Bordeaux tranches but the difference is that the wine is ready to ship now - not in 2-3 years). The winery uses an old-school method of automatic price increases every 12 months on their library stock and the same percentage is applied to every wine - a new release enters the library 3-6 months after its initial offer (the 2005's initial offer has come and gone - it is already sold out at this tranche), so, this wine will be around $30 by the winter and go up from there. A slice of magic held within a bottle (I won't even bother saying "very highly recommended" - I think that's obvious). Drink now and over the next century. 2005 Caves Bourdy Cotes du Jura Rouge - SOLD OUT (this is the top red wine from the estate, akin to any of the legendary vintages from 1900-present)

RJonWine.com

  • By Richard Jennings
    4/10/2010 (link) 93 points

    (Jean Bourdy Côtes du Jura Rouge) Medium red color with pale meniscus; brett, dried red fruit, mineral nose; complex, dried red fruit, brett, mineral, dried berry palate; medium-plus finish

Wine Definition

  • Vintage 2005
  • Type Red
  • Producer Jean Bourdy
  • Varietal Red Blend
  • Designation Rouge
  • Vineyard n/a
  • Country France
  • Region Jura
  • SubRegion n/a
  • Appellation Côtes du Jura

Community Holdings

  • Pending Delivery 34 (2%)
  • In Cellars 1,205 (73%)
  • Consumed 417 (25%)

Food Pairing

No food pairings available.

Who Likes This Wine

90% Like It  10 votes

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